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  • Dock lines?

    I'll be putting the boat (205v) in a slip at Tablerock for a week. I've never used a slip before and need help deciding what lines I will need. Length and how many? Stopped by the dealer and they only stock 10' dock lines. Unsure if this is what I need. If I need longer lines, where would I get them?

    Also, do you cover your boats at night when left in a slip?

  • #2
    Some nice lines available here.

    http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/hn...527049190.html
    - Peter
    TANDEM AXLE PACKAGE - $950 DELIVERED WHEEL IMAGE
    5 14X5.5 T06 WHEELS W/5 ST215/75R14 KENDA LOADSTAR RADIALS SS CENTER CAPS, LUGS, MOUNTED, BALANCED & READY TO INSTALL

    PM or email me for tire, wheel or package pricing.
    CARBURETOR REBUILDING - $125 + PARTS
    LED lights, Chrome & Powder Coated Lugs
    2 LED 6" BRAKE LIGHTS DELIVERED $25

    tiresplease@gmail.com

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    • #3
      Get four of the 10' dock lines, tie the boat from each corner to the dock, and make each rope tight enough that the boat can't hit either side of the slip. As long as the slip isn't too wide, 10' dock lines should be plenty. Tie up one side first with enough slack to let the boat float in the middle of the slip, then tie up the other side. The ropes don't have to be completely tight, but make it where the boat can't float to and rub one side at night.

      Cover is up to you. Can't hurt to cover it and have fewer bugs and dew to clean up in the morning.

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      • #4
        Thanks, guys. For some reason, I thought I read somewhere you'd need 20-25' lines.

        Thanks for the link, Peter. Those look like great lines, but if I can get away with 10 footers, I'll grab some at the dealer.

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        • #5
          don't forget the big bubble wrap - wrap boat every night - sleep well
          sigpic...A bad day water skiing still beats a good day at work...1995 Pro Star 205....

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          • #6
            Ha Ha...I do sleep well having her tucked away in the garage every night. First trip to Tablerock, though, so we are excited.

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            • #7
              I was about to ask the same question. Im taking the family for the first time to Smith Lake in AL. in July.

              Comment


              • #8
                We tie up in a slip every summer at Dale Hollow Lake. I have 3 ropes made up with Brass clips on one end. I tie the boat up as said so no matter which way the boat moves it cannot hit the dock. 1 on each rear corner and 1 in the front. It works great. After it is all tied up all we have to do is unsnap and go. When we get back we snap back in and done. Everyone in the boat knows what is going on and it goes really smooth. I don't have cleats on my 205 so the the 2 loops in the rear and the main trailer ing loop in the front is what I use. Also make it easy to cover at night with nothing in the way.

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                • #9
                  If I have a slip that has cleats on the dock on both sides (my preference), I use spring lines on both sides, if possible. Doing this keeps the boat from moving both forward/back and side/side with just four lines. Line length will depend upon the location of the cleats. This allows the boat to rock and pitch independent of the dock but keeps the boat 100% from rubbing against the dock if done correctly. I still put out fenders just in case.

                  My suggestion is to have lines that are a few feet longer than you boat. I've not regretted having longer lines. I keep two sets - one short set for short duration tie-ups for convenience and one long set just for as I talk about above.

                  Another effective method if you have an outside slip (I dislike), is to use spring lines combined with breast lines. But then fenders are imperative.

                  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mooring_(watercraft) for a picture of breast vs spring lines.

                  I just use my "trailerable" cover for overnight mooring.
                  I love to travel, but hate to arrive. ~~ A. Einstein
                  -----
                  You donít stop riding because youíre getting old, but you get old when you stop riding.
                  -----
                  Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a Ride! ~~ Hunter S. Thompson
                  -----
                  My wakeboard is calling, and I must go ride! ~~ Me

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Where you going on Table Rock? When you pick your slip (if you get to), pick one on the side of the dock that will block waves, and also as far in (away from the ends) as possible. Gets you a lot of protection that way so your boat isn't taking a beating.

                    Whenever I rent a slip for any amount of time, I tie my lines around the dock posts permanently for the week, and just slide the loop end through my cleat when I come tie up. Takes less time and you tie once for the week and all is good. Then I just leave my lines attached to the dock for the day, and when I pull back up after the day out I just grab my already tied line and slide it through my cleat.

                    Enjoy... Table Rock is an amazing lake. Couple TTers on that lake also!
                    -Mike

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by OHIOPRO205 View Post
                      We tie up in a slip every summer at Dale Hollow Lake. I have 3 ropes made up with Brass clips on one end. I tie the boat up as said so no matter which way the boat moves it cannot hit the dock. 1 on each rear corner and 1 in the front. It works great. After it is all tied up all we have to do is unsnap and go. When we get back we snap back in and done. Everyone in the boat knows what is going on and it goes really smooth. I don't have cleats on my 205 so the the 2 loops in the rear and the main trailer ing loop in the front is what I use. Also make it easy to cover at night with nothing in the way.
                      I don't have the cleats either and clips sound like a good idea. I've been watching Youtube videos on knot tying.

                      Originally posted by GoneBoatN View Post
                      If I have a slip that has cleats on the dock on both sides (my preference), I use spring lines on both sides, if possible. Doing this keeps the boat from moving both forward/back and side/side with just four lines. Line length will depend upon the location of the cleats. This allows the boat to rock and pitch independent of the dock but keeps the boat 100% from rubbing against the dock if done correctly. I still put out fenders just in case.

                      My suggestion is to have lines that are a few feet longer than you boat. I've not regretted having longer lines. I keep two sets - one short set for short duration tie-ups for convenience and one long set just for as I talk about above.

                      Another effective method if you have an outside slip (I dislike), is to use spring lines combined with breast lines. But then fenders are imperative.

                      See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mooring_(watercraft) for a picture of breast vs spring lines.

                      I just use my "trailerable" cover for overnight mooring.
                      Thanks for the advice and wikipedia link. That's great information and I'm much more confident now that I'll be able to figure it out once I get there. I'll pick up some longer lines as well because I have no idea the size of the slip or its location.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mzimme View Post
                        Where you going on Table Rock? When you pick your slip (if you get to), pick one on the side of the dock that will block waves, and also as far in (away from the ends) as possible. Gets you a lot of protection that way so your boat isn't taking a beating.

                        Whenever I rent a slip for any amount of time, I tie my lines around the dock posts permanently for the week, and just slide the loop end through my cleat when I come tie up. Takes less time and you tie once for the week and all is good. Then I just leave my lines attached to the dock for the day, and when I pull back up after the day out I just grab my already tied line and slide it through my cleat.

                        Enjoy... Table Rock is an amazing lake. Couple TTers on that lake also!
                        My wife rented a cabin at Indian Hill's Resort in Shell Knob. We were assigned a slip. My wife didn't know what size to get, so she requested a "big" one. We are new to all this, so it's always an adventure...we have fun, though. Heard wonderful things about the lake and can't wait to get there.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You should be fine up there in Shell Knob. Stays pretty calm, especially on a non-holiday weekend. You guys will have a blast.

                          ttu could give you a good idea of places to ski/board.

                          If you don't have cleats, go pick up some carribeaners... those climbing hooks. Clip them to your loops on your lines, and use them to clip fast onto your bow eye and your lift rings on the rear. That'll give you a quick way to tie up. If you can find them rubber coated, even better, but if not, just wrap electrical tape around them so they don't scratch your gel coat.
                          -Mike

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mzimme View Post
                            You should be fine up there in Shell Knob. Stays pretty calm, especially on a non-holiday weekend. You guys will have a blast.

                            ttu could give you a good idea of places to ski/board.

                            If you don't have cleats, go pick up some carribeaners... those climbing hooks. Clip them to your loops on your lines, and use them to clip fast onto your bow eye and your lift rings on the rear. That'll give you a quick way to tie up. If you can find them rubber coated, even better, but if not, just wrap electrical tape around them so they don't scratch your gel coat.
                            Great advice...thanks, Mike.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              IMO, cleats are a must have. I'd get some installed when time permits. The pull-up kind allow for them to be flush with the boat so that the rope from the tower does not catch when turning around to pickup a fallen rider. My boat has two in the front, two in the rear. I use the front tower legs to hang fenders from, otherwise I have two there as well.
                              I love to travel, but hate to arrive. ~~ A. Einstein
                              -----
                              You donít stop riding because youíre getting old, but you get old when you stop riding.
                              -----
                              Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a Ride! ~~ Hunter S. Thompson
                              -----
                              My wakeboard is calling, and I must go ride! ~~ Me

                              Comment

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