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  • Ski Dock Overhaul

    We’re in the beginning stages of brainstorming for a ski dock restoration for the club... A couple of ideas in our heads were what to use as far as materials... Those of you that have built docks, here are the questions:

    1. Do you prefer the marine treated wood or do do you prefer a synthetic lumber? Is there a huge difference between the two cost wise / durability wise?

    2. If you go with marine treated wood, I was looking into nonskid paint. I see Cabela’s and Overton's offer it for $80-90 per gallon. Is there a better /more durable product for less money? Has anyone used either of these products can vouch for it? Durable? How long does it last? Does it peel off or look like ‘carp’ when it does? What I definitely would not want is a maintenance nightmare.

    3. New regulations require utilizing encapsulated foam. Does anyone have a cheap resource? Also, is there a good way to calculate the amount needed? When we bought some for our jump restoration, it was a little too much and we had to counterweight the jump with anchors to put it at the right height.

    Thanks in advance

    MC
    What does the fox say?

    Ring-ding-ding-ding-dingeringeding...

    You know they all have a little string hanging out, but it's not a tampon, it's a price tag...

  • #2
    To answer one of your questions I would highly recommend composite decking attached with stainless steel fasteners. This will be the lowest maintenance for you and eliminate regular staining, splinters, etc. Several types have a embossed wood grain with them that make them look more like real wood and the raised grain makes them non slip. The product I have used on my dock and several decks is Evergrain. It has low expansion/contraction and has held up well to our Northwest weather. A nice way to attach this is with stainless steel screws called Headcoat. They have a painted head to match the material and when drilled correctly sit nice and flush. The lack of maintenance alone will pay for he increased cost of the material.
    sigpic1999 Prostar 205 with 330 HP LTR

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    • #3
      That evergrain is eye candy - wow - that is nice stuff!

      Any idea on cost per sf? a quick glance on the website does not show it.
      What does the fox say?

      Ring-ding-ding-ding-dingeringeding...

      You know they all have a little string hanging out, but it's not a tampon, it's a price tag...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by TxsRiverRat View Post
        That evergrain is eye candy - wow - that is nice stuff!

        Any idea on cost per sf? a quick glance on the website does not show it.
        Iirc about $2-2.50 per lineal foot for the 6" wide decking that is 1" thick. They also have some nice colors if you want to do a different color for a surround or accents. Really easy to cut and work with. It is fairly heavy though so you need some good floats for your dock.
        sigpic1999 Prostar 205 with 330 HP LTR

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        • #5
          My father in law used composite decking and stainless hardware on his dock. The piers and substructure was treated plywood. 10 years later and it still looks great. He also affixed tar paper to the upward facing surfaces in the pier and substructure to allow water to run off.
          Previous: 1993 Prostar 205

          Red 1998 Closed Bow Ski Boat, Ford 351, 310 hp, Acme 4 blade, Perfect Pass SG.

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          To me, this forum is about love of inboard boats. It is about the sharing of information and, on a good day, some humor. It is not about post count, brand of boat, or any other superfluous labels that lend themselves to a false sense of superiority. Please, respect one another, try to pass on accurate information, and keep your eye on the ball.

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          • #6
            My father built one with marine wood and it is a very nice dock but over the past three years or so, it has had quote a bit of shrinkage. I tried to prolong the life of my deck at my house by putting the non skid surface and it seems to work well, but is really a pain to paint on, especially if you do it after the fact. Doing it before wouldn't be so bad but if you are spending the extra money, I would put it into composite decking. No rotting to worry about. It is denser than wood and tends to get prretyy warm in the sun but that is something pretty minor.

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            • #7
              What is "marine wood" or "marine treated wood"? I have never heard of those terms.

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              • #8
                We have a "TREX" deck, it's 11 years old. Last summer, we power washed it, it still looks brand new. No warpage at all. I think that's pretty good considering the extreme weather patterns of Minnesota. It could be 40-50 below zero in the winter months to 100 plus in the summer. Of course YMMV and it is $$$ but Its worth it for ZERO maintenance!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by TRBenj View Post
                  What is "marine wood" or "marine treated wood"? I have never heard of those terms.
                  Probably a difference in nomenclature... I am referring to a treated / pressure treated wood. Our current dock has been in use for the last 10 years with the wood currently on it.

                  Originally posted by Skir68 View Post
                  We have a "TREX" deck, it's 11 years old. Last summer, we power washed it, it still looks brand new. No warpage at all. I think that's pretty good considering the extreme weather patterns of Minnesota. It could be 40-50 below zero in the winter months to 100 plus in the summer. Of course YMMV and it is $$$ but Its worth it for ZERO maintenance!
                  Trex = also gorgeous material - estimate on cost?

                  Originally posted by CC2MC View Post
                  My father built one with marine wood and it is a very nice dock but over the past three years or so, it has had quote a bit of shrinkage. I tried to prolong the life of my deck at my house by putting the non skid surface and it seems to work well, but is really a pain to paint on, especially if you do it after the fact. Doing it before wouldn't be so bad but if you are spending the extra money, I would put it into composite decking. No rotting to worry about. It is denser than wood and tends to get prretyy warm in the sun but that is something pretty minor.
                  thats what I was thinking...

                  Originally posted by russlars View Post
                  Iirc about $2-2.50 per lineal foot for the 6" wide decking that is 1" thick. They also have some nice colors if you want to do a different color for a surround or accents. Really easy to cut and work with. It is fairly heavy though so you need some good floats for your dock.
                  we are required to use encapsulated foam now, so add $$$ to the tab

                  Originally posted by east tx skier View Post
                  My father in law used composite decking and stainless hardware on his dock. The piers and substructure was treated plywood. 10 years later and it still looks great. He also affixed tar paper to the upward facing surfaces in the pier and substructure to allow water to run off.
                  definitely stainless - we need repairs to be easy...
                  What does the fox say?

                  Ring-ding-ding-ding-dingeringeding...

                  You know they all have a little string hanging out, but it's not a tampon, it's a price tag...

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                  • #10
                    I think the grey trex is like 40 bucks a board? We had it on our boat dock that was built in 05, and it still looks new.
                    "if one day the speed kills me, do not cry because i was smiling." -Paul Walker

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                    • #11
                      Bigger is better!
                      2002 Blue Prostar 197, 0 Flex Tower, Perfect Pass, and The Preditor-ADHD Skier

                      I'm pursuing my lifelong quest for the perfect, the absolutely driest martini to be found in this or any other world. And I think I may have hit upon the perfect formula :

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                      • #12
                        If you want low maintenance, frame it out and pour a 3" concrete slab. Put floats under it, and you're done forever. It sounds a little crazy, but my entire marina is poured concrete. It is extremely stable and little to no maintenance. The cost will compare favorably against any of the composite decking you are looking at. You will need a few extra floats. What size dock are we talking? How high do you want it to float?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TxsRiverRat View Post
                          Probably a difference in nomenclature... I am referring to a treated / pressure treated wood. Our current dock has been in use for the last 10 years with the wood currently on it.
                          Gotcha. Its referred to as "pressure treated" wood around here. Commonly used for docks, decks, etc.

                          I am familiar with "marine plywood", which has no allowance for internal voids like the grades used for construction- making it appropriate for use in a boat hull. Its not treated in any way, though. I figured that wasnt what you were referring to.

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                          • #14
                            We have redone both of our dock, ramp and ski, since 2005. We did the ski dock first. It was built completely out of treated wood. We have since used a product called Restore on the top deck for non skid and to help preserve the top decking. We have the corners of the dock where we have our swim ladder and put on skis carpeted since the non skid is rough on the bottom of equipment. 7 years later it is still in pretty good shape although we have had to do some repair here and theer to the top deck boards.

                            The smaller dock at our ramp has a pressure treated frame with synthetic deck. MUCH better than our ski dock but it was cost prohibitive at the time to do our ski dock with the synthetic deck boards. The boards are about 6 times the cost of pressure treated and you also have additional framing costs due to the fact the synthetic can not span as far. This dock still looks like new with the exception of a little dirt. We generally just pressure wash once a year.

                            Both of our docks are floating on the plastic 55 gallon drums which we sourced from our local Chemdry. They work great and are very inexpensive.

                            I would highly reccomend the synthetic decking if you can swing the expense.
                            sigpic

                            1997 Prostar 190, TBI 350, 1:1, OJ XMP 13 x 11.5, Stargazer, Hot Shower, Heated Drivers Seat, Reuben/Mountain Rock/Nite Navy


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                            • #15
                              Most of the new syn decking have side access for screws, there will be no screws showing on top, it looks really good. SS screws are definitely the way to go.

                              I found the cost of syn to be more than 4Xs the price, so I went with lumber. I used no space between boards, it looks good as there is shrinkage.
                              1997 PS 205

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