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Dry aged beef??

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  • Dry aged beef??

    Anyone ever attempt to dry age beef at home?

    From everything I've read so far.

    Air flow - gotta have good air flow in your chill box/frig
    Temp - temp has to be between 35 and 38 degrees
    Time - between 21 and 34 days
    Salt - I've seen where some people put a bed of salt under the meat with the meat suspended a couple of inches over it

    Results, supposed to retain more flavor.
    Last edited by CantRepeat; 12-31-2013, 08:38 AM. Reason: beer > beef
    Tim
    Gone, surfing.

  • #2
    My son and his wife gave me a Himalayan salt block for Christmas. Never really heard or paid much attention to them but supposedly they are getting pretty popular. They also gave me a cook book and one of the pages showed how you can get two of the salt blocks and put the meat in between then wrap and stick in fridge. The salt block pulls the moisture out (dry ages the beef). Same thing with fish. People are also using them for sun drying tomatoes.

    I cooked on it for the first time last night and the are pretty neat.

    Here are some links I found doing a google search.

    https://www.google.com/webhp?hl=en&t...eef+salt+block

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    • #3
      here is one I picked up on the net, not dried beef but it would be a start

      Stupid-Simple Roast Beef with Horseradish Cream
      INGREDIENTS
      1 cup plus 1 tablespoon kosher salt
      One 7- to 8-pound top round beef roast, tied with the full fat cap on the roast
      1 tablespoon freshly ground pepper, plus more for seasoning
      1 cup sour cream
      1/2 cup prepared horseradish
      DIRECTIONS
      1. Set a rack over a baking sheet. Rub 1/2 cup of the salt all over the roast and let stand for 10 minutes. Repeat with another 1/2 cup of the salt. Transfer the roast to the rack and refrigerate uncovered for 2 days. Bring to room temperature 3 hours before roasting.
      2. Preheat the oven to 450į. Season the meat with pepper and roast for 20 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 225į and roast for about 1 hour and 30 minutes longer, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the roast registers 120į. Let the meat rest for 30 minutes.
      3. In a bowl, mix the sour cream with the horseradish and the remaining 1 tablespoon of salt and pepper. Slice the roast and serve with the horseradish cream.
      Make Ahead The roast beef can be refrigerated for up to 2 days. Serve warm or chilled. The sauce can be refrigerated for up to 2 days.

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      • #4
        I know a guy from TX who did it once, I will see if I can find out what he did
        '97 Prostar 190 - LT-1

        Prior boats - 2009 X14, 2008 X14, 2005 197, 1988 Tristar 190, 1989 Prostar.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by CantRepeat View Post
          Anyone ever attempt to dry age beer at home?

          From everything I've read so far.

          Air flow - gotta have good air flow in your chill box/frig
          Temp - temp has to be between 35 and 38 degrees
          Time - between 21 and 34 days
          Salt - I've seen where some people put a bed of salt under the meat with the meat suspended a couple of inches over it

          Results, supposed to retain more flavor.
          Assume you meant beef here?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by scott023 View Post
            Assume you meant beef here?
            Freudian slip.
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            PM or email me for tire, wheel or package pricing.
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            • #7
              I’ve dry aged Prime Rib a few times. The first time I did it I was scared is was ruining an expensive piece of meat, but after how well it turned out I’ve done it a few times now.

              I pat the meat dry and then wrap it with cheese cloth and place it on a cookie sheet with a raised grate. I don’t season the meat either. After 24 hours I remove the cheese cloth and rewrap it with some fresh cheese cloth and put it back in the fridge for 10 days. The frig is one that I don’t use often so the temp stays consent and cool. When ready to cook I remove the cheese cloth and cut off any dried or crusty meat or fat, season to my liking and cook it. The meat is so tender no knife is required.

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              • #8
                Why dry age at home when you can buy Brasstown Beef?

                http://www.brasstownbeef.com/#!
                Bailey
                '02 X-9
                Lake Blue Ridge

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by CruisinGA View Post
                  Why dry age at home when you can buy Brasstown Beef?

                  http://www.brasstownbeef.com/#!
                  Price??

                  After reading their page it doesn't seem that they offer dry aged meets. Just cryovac wet aged.

                  edit

                  Buying a whole PSMO tenderloin is about $12 a pound where as buying a butchered filet is $16+ a pound. Dry aging meat seems to double or triple that price in a restaurant. I haven't look for online or local sales of dry aged meats.

                  The big savings seems to be on prime rib and bone in rib eyes.

                  I guess you could also toss in the hobby of it. Kind of like brewing your own beer.
                  Last edited by CantRepeat; 12-31-2013, 10:24 AM.
                  Tim
                  Gone, surfing.

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                  • #10
                    Reminded me of this article I came across several months ago: http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/01/t...f-at-home.html

                    I'm not saying it's true and accurate just because it's on the internet. Who knows, maybe this was secretly put out there by some steakhouse chain who wants to discourage home-aging. But after reading this, my conclusion was that it's probably not worth the trouble.

                    Make up your own mind. If you try it, I hope you prove me wrong... and let us know so we can try it too!
                    / \

                    Former boats:
                    2003 Prostar 197 35th Anniversary
                    1990 Prostar 190

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jstewart319 View Post
                      Iíve dry aged Prime Rib a few times. The first time I did it I was scared is was ruining an expensive piece of meat, but after how well it turned out Iíve done it a few times now.

                      I pat the meat dry and then wrap it with cheese cloth and place it on a cookie sheet with a raised grate. I donít season the meat either. After 24 hours I remove the cheese cloth and rewrap it with some fresh cheese cloth and put it back in the fridge for 10 days. The frig is one that I donít use often so the temp stays consent and cool. When ready to cook I remove the cheese cloth and cut off any dried or crusty meat or fat, season to my liking and cook it. The meat is so tender no knife is required.
                      That sounds similar to the method Alton Brown taught on his show, though I think he only dried it for 3 or 4 days.
                      / \

                      Former boats:
                      2003 Prostar 197 35th Anniversary
                      1990 Prostar 190

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by shepherd View Post
                        Reminded me of this article I came across several months ago: http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/01/t...f-at-home.html

                        I'm not saying it's true and accurate just because it's on the internet. Who knows, maybe this was secretly put out there by some steakhouse chain who wants to discourage home-aging. But after reading this, my conclusion was that it's probably not worth the trouble.

                        Make up your own mind. If you try it, I hope you prove me wrong... and let us know so we can try it too!
                        Nice article.

                        I think the biggest hurdle will be the humidity. It seems most commercial aging rooms run around 65% and I've read that most refrigerators run at 85%+. How much that will affect the process is anyone's guess.

                        I've only had dry aged meat once and the more I read about it I don't think it was truly dry aged. It was at a steak house in Vegas and I ordered a filet which seems to be one of the only meats that doesn't benefit from aging like other meats. I read where dry aging beef tenderloin is only done for a few days and not months. So the results of aging a filet would not be the same as say a large bone in rib eye.

                        I do intend to give it try so I'll let you know how it turns out.
                        Tim
                        Gone, surfing.

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                        • #13
                          Buddy of mine does it all the time. Uses his second refridgerator that doesn't get opened much. He does whole rib eyes, and prime ribs. Turns out absolutely amazing. If I had a spare fridge I'd do it all the time.
                          sigpic

                          1997 Prostar 190, TBI 350, 1:1, OJ XMP 13 x 11.5, Stargazer, Hot Shower, Heated Drivers Seat, Reuben/Mountain Rock/Nite Navy


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                          • #14
                            CantRepeat, what type of meat will you be dry aging? I've done a couple commercial drying/aging chambers and may be able to help

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                            • #15
                              Thanks Lukedeuce.

                              At this point I'm trying to figure out how to convert a frig to dry age beef. Everything I've read leads me to believe that rib eyes are the standard. That is dry aging tbones, porter house or tenderloin isn't the way to go. NY strips are a good choice too.

                              I know I need air flow and humidity around 65% and then some salts. I know in large commercial frigs they use a rock salt wall but in smaller places a tray of salt is used.

                              I'm rookie at this point so figured there might be some folks that have done it at home and had ideas to share. I'm pretty close to doing this now. I have a source for 120v 80mm fans for the frig but am always open to ideas.
                              Tim
                              Gone, surfing.

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