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Old 09-15-2020, 01:58 PM
budwayz budwayz is offline
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Carb Replacement Question

I have a 1994 Maristar 225, and the carb is on its way out. The engine was replaced in 2013-2014, and from what I can tell, the previous owner has replaced the carb a couple of times (rather than rebuilding it and retuning it, I guess?). I had it looked at by a mechanic and they told me that the carb the previous owner had been using was not the recommended one for that engine and suggested THIS HOLLY CARBURETOR.

After doing some research, I found the same model carb, but with mechanical secondaries as opposed to vacuum secondaries (which is what the one above has). The mechanical secondaries carb is about $300 cheaper and appears to be identical besides the secondaries. It can be found HERE.

So, is there a need to spend $300 extra for the difference between vacuum or mechanical secondaries? Does either carb provide a benefit over the other besides cost? Thank you guys in advance!
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Old 09-15-2020, 02:18 PM
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waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by budwayz View Post
I have a 1994 Maristar 225, and the carb is on its way out. The engine was replaced in 2013-2014, and from what I can tell, the previous owner has replaced the carb a couple of times (rather than rebuilding it and retuning it, I guess?). I had it looked at by a mechanic and they told me that the carb the previous owner had been using was not the recommended one for that engine and suggested THIS HOLLY CARBURETOR.

After doing some research, I found the same model carb, but with mechanical secondaries as opposed to vacuum secondaries (which is what the one above has). The mechanical secondaries carb is about $300 cheaper and appears to be identical besides the secondaries. It can be found HERE.

So, is there a need to spend $300 extra for the difference between vacuum or mechanical secondaries? Does either carb provide a benefit over the other besides cost? Thank you guys in advance!
I am curious and maybe ignorant to the engine setup in your 94 Maristar. Does your 94 have the Ford or Chevrolet engine?

My notes say the mechanic is incorrect in his recommendation.

The 4150 mechanical carburetor is more for manual shift transmissions (with dual accelerator pumps).

The 4160 is my recommendation well over the 4150, where the vacuum secondary is related to load demand (vacuum) and automatic transmissions or in your case, a single gear transmission. The load demand from the engine and that specific use of the boat requires the vacuum carburetor for best performance.

.
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Last edited by waterlogged882; 09-15-2020 at 02:35 PM.
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Old 09-15-2020, 07:30 PM
budwayz budwayz is offline
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Interesting! Thanks for the info!

The engine is the 350, not the 351, but it's not an original Mastercraft engine, so that might change the specific carb recommended for it. The mechanic said he called the engine manufacturer and they recommended the vacuum 4150 carb. The carb currently on there now is a vacuum 4160, but it's Edelbrock, not Holley (not sure if that matters).

I know the info I gave you so far is limited, but do you think a rebuild might be more beneficial than a rebuild? The carb has only been on there for maybe 150ish hours. I made a post a while ago about the issues with it bogging down, so I'm thinking it might just be a little too rich right now. Thanks again for any other info!
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Old 09-15-2020, 08:06 PM
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waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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In my experience of carburetors, the Holley 4160 is my recommendation. Your call.

Please don't take my word as the final call. The mechanic person likely knows more about the setup than I can discern from here. What you have to consider is the origin of the current engine. Is it automotive based and built? Or is it the OEM that has been converted to carburated fuel feed from OEM TBI setup.

If automotive replacement, you likely have bigger issues with that scenario than meets the eye. All spark-related components have to be marine rated etc.. Just saying, take all of that into consideration for safety and best performance. Automotive blocks (and heads) typically work but beyond that everything is different, including some of the tune-up settings. Make sure you know the problem before trying to solve it. Just trying to be honest here to save you throwing parts at it and not getting the results you want.

As for the carburetor rebuild, that too is up to you but 150 hours is not much use, or in that use there may be stale, untreated, ethanol-laced fuel. It's hard to say from this end of a keyboard. Jets may be clogged, fuel bowl needle to feed the fuel may be stuck open or closed from trash...a vacuum leak at the base of the carburetor, etc.. Lots of possibilities so don't make presumptuous conclusions. Much easier on the budget that way.

I will say this, it's hard to work from multiple sources of information so don't pit the mechanic against advice and recommendations here. Just gather information and make decisions on a basis of best judgement. You could also have a dirty fuel filter at the canister or at the pick-up in the fuel cell. The fuel pump could be going south...Find the problem before replacing parts.

I will also say this; in case you stumble across an ad from National Carburetor... stay away.

There is a fellow here that will do a rebuild for a nominal fee. He does good work. And it's about time he runs a fall special. Contact thatsmrmastercraft here.

Best luck. Others here may be able to add something that I am not aware but a carburetor is sort of a stand alone unit, and does not know what brand of cylinders it is feeding. It just supplies the fuel, therefore I share my little bit of advice based on Ford experience.

Did I mention the Holley 4160? Shop at Discount Inboard Marine and use their 10% discount code of "USA." I got one from them recently and am pleased with the plug-and-play unit, however I knew mine was not conducive to a rebuild.

There is another thread here in this very section I posted about tweaking a Holley 4160. Plenty of other sources and folks here with knowledge...they just don't post.

Your OEM engine should have been a TBI fueled Chevrolet 350 and it is suspect that someone has converted to a carburated fuel supply. Not a good move in my opinion. I am 99.5% sure it was TBI when it came from the factory. Thus my question about the engine make, etc. The engine could also be an automotive engine that had a carburetor on it in ts beginning and placed in the boat.

Best on the resolution and keep updates posted here for others to find resolution to similar issues.

.

Last edited by waterlogged882; 09-15-2020 at 09:11 PM.
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Old 09-16-2020, 09:28 AM
budwayz budwayz is offline
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Thank you so much for the great information! I'll definitely be taking all of it into consideration! Hopefully I can get this sorted before the season ends so I can winterize it and have it set to go next spring!
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Old 09-16-2020, 09:54 AM
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d2jp d2jp is offline
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Without more specifics, it's hard to "diagnose" what your mechanic is dealing with. But, generally speaking an Edlebrock or Holley carb can be rebuilt fairly inexpensively and not too tough as a DIY. As Waterlogged pointed out, the Holley 4160 is by far the most common carb for small block marine engines, but Edlebrock is not an 'inferior' carb its just a different design. Worth digging into the rebuild or trying to fine tune yours as first option IMO. I've read that Moomba (and possibly others) used the 4150 as OEM carb into the mid-2000s. Not sure the reasoning but take a read through the Moomba owners forum...might find more information related to that.
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