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Old 03-29-2019, 02:57 PM
sticknrudder sticknrudder is offline
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1995 MasterCraft ProStar 190 carpet replacement

About to start a carpet project. Thinking of redoing the bow as well so I donít have a splice at the observers seat. Anyone done this?

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Old 03-29-2019, 03:15 PM
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Anyone done this?
Yes on the carpet.

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Old 03-29-2019, 03:22 PM
sticknrudder sticknrudder is offline
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Yes on the carpet.

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Did you do the bow section as well? 2 or 1 piece?
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Old 03-29-2019, 04:57 PM
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waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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Did you do the bow section as well? 2 or 1 piece?
When I do a refurb on an older boat and have everything apart, yes.

For my 93 and most I have seen as well, cut the carpet under the dash area / driver foot board area and stop there. That is all I do. It's not that big of deal to me and certainly not a lot of foot traffic under the deck. You can make a butt joint there that is almost undetectable if you do it in a particular manner.

If you replace the carpet yourself (a fairly easy job) and are looking for a few pointers to save you headache, I can suggest a few from lessons learned. Don't go ripping out carpet right off like a mad man. Save it in as much of wholes pieces as possible for a template. That means from the back to the front..take out the old in a caring way.

I do the driver's side (cut behind the foot rest....it comes out), then the passenger side (cut just inside the seat base), then the three middle floor pieces (self explanatory).

There is also a way to remove and reinstall the old and new carpet with a hook blade utility knife for getting under the deck pieces that are sitting on the carpet, then a particular trick I use for seering exposed edges and gluing the edges where the carpet wraps onto the floor (edge) at the center hull locations. Carpet glue is not the answer there. It will wear you out trying to figure out how to make is stick (cure) to the 90 degree fold.

Clean the exposed floor surface with 80 grit paper on a belt sander. Doesn't have to be perfect but it does need to be somewhat clean and clear of bulging glue under the new carpet.

Buy a roll of marine grade carpet that is 8.5 ft wide. I recommend 20 oz. short cut pile carpet.

Do the hull and the floor (each side) in one piece...start by laying in on the floor and on up the hull...do that in two steps (flat floor first letting the glue cure overnight, then on up the hull)... no seams at the transition from floor to hull. As you lay the carpet across the hull, you'll find the need to slice the carpet in a few places to allow it to conform to the contour (radius) of the hull. Using the old carpet template that came out will minimize this installation tactic. That is OK because those slits will never be seen (under the gunnel areas). Center pieces are all separate cuts (each). Leave the floor edges leading to (adjacent) the center section un-glued for now...just cut enough to make the wrap on the edge and glue later after the primary areas are in place and cured. Much easier to wait and glue that last in all 90 degree wrapped edges.

One important thing to remember as you cut each piece...make sure you get the carpet fiber sweep all going in the same direction. I prefer front to back. If you do not, it will make the carpet look odd when you vacuum it.


I did a 93 190 not too long ago. I took about four Saturdays to do the work.

There is more.

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Old 03-29-2019, 08:09 PM
sticknrudder sticknrudder is offline
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Wow thank you for the detailed tutorial! Two questions: When you speak of splicing the carpet, are you referring to that small area between the front most center piece and the base of the observers seat? Mine looks like one piece there.



2nd question: When cutting out the old carpet, do you recommend cutting the splice say an inch underneath the observers seat following the contour? Or is a straight line better? Thanks
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Old 03-29-2019, 09:13 PM
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Wow thank you for the detailed tutorial! Two questions: When you speak of splicing the carpet, are you referring to that small area between the front most center piece and the base of the observers seat? Mine looks like one piece there.

2nd question: When cutting out the old carpet, do you recommend cutting the splice say an inch underneath the observers seat following the contour? Or is a straight line better? Thanks
1) I am referring to a butt joint or splice at the very front most location where you cut the old carpet out (driver side in front of the foot rest).

Side bar: buy a 25 foot roll (economical and best serving). Then roll out the length say 10-12 feet (or whatever it is) and get one full piece (width and length) for the port side. If you prefer include the small center area section on that particular cut to make it fit best for you.

I'd be inclined to remove the driver seat and go to the rear of the boat on driver side. Go up in under the gunnel and start pulling that out in one whole piece (if possible) all the way down the hull and to the center section edge. If you have to make a cut to get it out, cut at the intersection of the hull and floor, but the idea is to get you a good template (whatever works best for your application). Pull that out all the way to the front (if possible) or to the point where you like the fit.

What I did was on the port side, I made that new cut all the way up the port side and over to the width of the center section. Your newer year model may be one piece to just cut that area full width of the boat and joint the starboard side right behind the driver seat. But really, look it over and plan out what you think works best for you.

2) I went in just behind the observer seat and made the cut just inside as close as practical around the contour of the base. That leaves the OEM carpet in place as much as possible and visibly acceptable. I did not try and butt in a new piece right up against. The splice (regardless of the fit) is hidden and secured under the seat base when you screw it back down. I then took out the old with a hook blade and got as much as I could (from the front side of the base). It won't be perfect but also no one will ever see it under the lip of the seat base. Pretty much the easiest way aside from lifting the entire deck. Then lay in the new piece under the lip. Use an straight edge to smooth it out (while prying up the lip with an angled pry bar). You'll see what I mean when you get going. It's not hard to do, just a bit tedious. Two people make it much easier.

My rule of thumb is to not have a butt joint anywhere on the floor where foot traffic is. It will eventually start showing. That is why I like to roll out a long piece to fit in on the floor entirely in one piece (excluding the individual center sections of floor) back to front as practical. Make your butts somewhere out of sight or in a very low traffic area, where I usually get right behind the driver's seat. You shouldn't have but three, maybe four and all of those will be out of sight or out of traffic

I hope this makes sense and answers your questions. If not, post up and I'll see if I can hit the target better. Think it through for best results to your plan. I am sure there are other options and considerations by others here. I just try and keep it simple.

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Last edited by waterlogged882; 03-30-2019 at 02:20 PM.
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Old 03-30-2019, 11:50 AM
sticknrudder sticknrudder is offline
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That helps a lot. If Iím understanding correctly, there are two runners of carpet, one for the passenger side and one for the drivers side. It appears on my boat that is all one puece so there is no splice in the middle. If I separated it as two runners, the area the splice would be is probably only an inch or two. Would you still recommend doing it as two runners and have a butt joint there? My only concern is itís a high traffic area. The red is where I appear to have no splice but where the splice would have to be if I did it as two.

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Old 03-30-2019, 12:02 PM
sticknrudder sticknrudder is offline
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To my dismay, I discovered last night when pulling up the carpet, that next to the ski pylon on both the passenger and drivers sides, the floor is cracked. Is this going to require repair?







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Old 03-30-2019, 01:51 PM
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waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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I would not sweat that at all. That is nothing structural per se'. If you feel inclined to repair it, there are several options but honestly, I'd not give that a second thought. The floor is nothing more that an underlayment (for the carpet) on top of foam-filled channels.

Those stress cracks are likely from a high ski pylon over the top of the OEM pylon. Contrary to popular and deniable belief, these shallow-hull boats are not made for wake or surf shenanigans. I read a thread here the other day about some folks trying to add 2-3000 pounds of weight to a Prostar hull to "sink it.".. Made me laugh a little.

If you want to fix it, I can suggest several options or others here may have suggestions as well.

Where you circled, just cut an entire piece over the hole over to the starboard hull, install it and cut out the hole. Zero seams. Part of thinking through the process to best work for you. Then you can run the starboard hull on out from there. Just figure best where the seams will land. The trick to closing the seams is hot glue. Get an inexpensive hot glue gun (Walmart) and a bag or three of glue sticks at the seams and the edges that wrap, use hot glue to sear and baton down the edges and also use a little bit at each edge at a seam to bond them together. a small bead of glue and a finger pinch and you'll never see it.

I would cut two pieces. Starboard from the rear to the back of the drivers seat. Then port side from the back to the front (under the seat base) and all the way across to the starboard hull to the intersecting edges (floor and hull). Make it join there or anywhere else you like. That is the least traffic but that is also the most tedious place to bond the edges. Sort of a compromise on your preference.

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Last edited by waterlogged882; 03-30-2019 at 02:14 PM.
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Old 03-30-2019, 02:32 PM
sticknrudder sticknrudder is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waterlogged882 View Post
I would not sweat that at all. That is nothing structural per se'. If you feel inclined to repair it, there are several options but honestly, I'd not give that a second thought. The floor is nothing more that an underlayment (for the carpet) on top of foam-filled channels.

Those stress cracks are likely from a high ski pylon over the top of the OEM pylon. Contrary to popular and deniable belief, these shallow-hull boats are not made for wake or surf shenanigans. I read a thread here the other day about some folks trying to add 2-3000 pounds of weight to a Prostar hull to "sink it.".. Made me laugh a little.

If you want to fix it, I can suggest several options or others here may have suggestions as well.

Where you circled, just cut an entire piece over the hole over to the starboard hull, install it and cut out the hole. Zero seams. Part of thinking through the process to best work for you. Then you can run the starboard hull on out from there. Just figure best where the seams will land. The trick to closing the seams is hot glue. Get an inexpensive hot glue gun (Walmart) and a bag or three of glue sticks at the seams and the edges that wrap, use hot glue to sear and baton down the edges and also use a little bit at each edge at a seam to bond them together. a small bead of glue and a finger pinch and you'll never see it.

I would cut two pieces. Starboard from the rear to the back of the drivers seat. Then port side from the back to the front (under the seat base) and all the way across to the starboard hull to the intersecting edges (floor and hull). Make it join there or anywhere else you like. That is the least traffic but that is also the most tedious place to bond the edges. Sort of a compromise on your preference.

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Oh wow thatís good news! Iíve been concerned with having to repair that. I took an advanced composites class in college where I learned how to repair fiberglass and vacuum bag the layup, but I was afraid this was structural and would break again. That makes sense that it would be caused by an attachment. I know there is a barefoot boom that came with the boat and maybe even an extension. Iím pretty sure the previous owner wakeboarded and even parasailed with it. I strictly slalom. So you think if I leave it I wonít regret it down the road from it cracking worse and creating a soft spot or a floor with a ledge? If you were to repair what would you do?
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