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  • #16
    Waterlogged, that old 82 looks as though it has been ridden hard and put away wet for at least a portion of its' life. Let's forget about the surface stuff (scratches, minor stress cracks, chips, tears, osmosis, etc.) as I presume there will be examples of all those at this point. The big stuff is rot (stern and stringers). How do you determine if the work needs to be done eventually, soon, or immediately? If I go take a look at that '82 as a potential project (it only resides about an hour away), what is your checklist to determine the boat health? Other than trying to turn motor mount bolts and poking around in the bilge I'm out of tricks. I suppose I'm asking for some wisdom with diagnosing Mastercraft health from that era.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by PineLakeRumble View Post
      Waterlogged, that old 82 looks as though it has been ridden hard and put away wet for at least a portion of its' life. Let's forget about the surface stuff (scratches, minor stress cracks, chips, tears, osmosis, etc.) as I presume there will be examples of all those at this point.

      The big stuff is rot (stern and stringers). How do you determine if the work needs to be done eventually, soon, or immediately?

      Couple of ways to look at that question; 1) if I go into the deal with intent to build it solid, I'll strip the boat to the bare hull. Timing is a matter of when one is willing to go forward. 2) If a fellow is wanting to get an idea on stringers, that can be done several ways; a) tighten the lags (as you spoke) and see if they bite. If they spin, there is nothing inside to grip, b) visual inspection but one has to be willing to take out the front and read center floor sections to access that area for the visual, but 3) at that point, take a ball peen or roofing hammer and tap the stringers up and down the length, listening for a solid tap or a hollow tap (my preferred method), and 4) drill a 1" diameter hole with a hole bit and inspect the material in the bit. Most sellers do not want this but it does not harm the structural integrity of the stringer. It it already belongs to you, no sweat. An easy fix one way or another.

      If I go take a look at that '82 as a potential project (it only resides about an hour away), what is your checklist to determine the boat health? Other than trying to turn motor mount bolts and poking around in the bilge I'm out of tricks. I suppose I'm asking for some wisdom with diagnosing Mastercraft health from that era.

      See above. I will say this also; 1982 wood is ready to be replaced due to natural wood decay.

      As to the transom, same situation. What I have learned to do is this: before I strip the boat, I rotate the fuel cell out onto the floor for near term access. Go to the outside and adjacent (symmetrically) to the rear drain plug, drill another 7/8" diameter hole for a second plug, in particular on a slot hull. You can then inspect the hole's cross-section as well as the material in the hole bit you used. That is a tell-tale way to determining if the transom needs attention. If it does, it is easy to cut out (from the inside) and replace the main piece, gel coat intact.
      There is no real fool-proof way to determine how much life is remaining in wood but I have seen the wood go from 35-45 years. Here is next to the last one I cut open. Do not let the fiberglass mat covering fool you...it always looks good (relatively speaking). You can see where the tops were cut open once the floor was lifted.

      I have also seen scabbed areas just under the engine. That is nothing but a band-aid waiting on failure.

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      Last edited by waterlogged882; 09-16-2022, 01:16 PM.
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      • #18
        Thank you very much! I really appreciate your time. That boat hasn't be run in a couple of years. The fuel in the tank and carb could be varnish. There won't be a water test. IF I'm willing to take the plunge, what would you consider a fair offer? No trailer.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by PineLakeRumble View Post
          Thank you very much! I really appreciate your time. That boat hasn't be run in a couple of years. The fuel in the tank and carb could be varnish. There won't be a water test. IF I'm willing to take the plunge, what would you consider a fair offer? No trailer.
          Hard to say without seeing a little more, in particular the engine.

          I would want to see that is has the correct carburetor, if not there lies another US$1K for a new 4160, and right now none are available anywhere.

          I would also want to see the general condition of the engine.

          That particular machine came OEM with the deluxe interior package. I can tell that by what little I can see, which is a good thing.

          Then there is carpet.

          Then a trailer for transport.

          Windshield OK? They are non-existent as far as replacement, aside from a new custom make ($$$).

          Basic operational function...cables, prop, rudder, fins, instrument gauges, wiring, etc.

          Rest assured there is foam up front under the deck and under the floor (often times water-saturated).

          Right now (without seeing) it is a pig in the poke.

          No trailer is another $1 - 1.5K if you can find one. I recently saw an OEM for that make for $1,100.

          So with all of these considerations (on my spreadsheet), I'd be hard pressed to offer much more than $2.5K, allowing myself the expense of the aforementioned, at-risk considerations.

          If I saw a good engine with good compression numbers (an easy test) and a Holley 4160 carburetor with the correct fuel line (metal OEM), that would ease my mind.

          But also bear in mind, I think like I am going to make it a rebuild at some added cost, regardless to what extent. Others think like this seller is pricing; turn key at your risk, knowing it needs work. I suspect that fellow has priced it high, hoping there is a pandemic panic buyer still out there. That crap is over, not to mention ridiculous from the get-go (all the suckers that took the bait...lol).

          Show me a few more photos if available and I would be willing to re-assess.

          .
          93 190
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          John 14:6
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          • #20
            Waterlogged, I had a chance to see the boat and learned a lot. I appreciated your earlier checklist. The seller was great. He allowed me to pull up the floor, Turn motor mount bolts, and play with the mechanicals. It had the correct carb and fuel line. The majority of the motor mount bolts still had bite. The carpet and interior was toast but I new that going in. Lots osmosis and spider cracking on the hull. It was obvious that the stringers are due along with the floor and interior. The seller and I got along well and he was open about what he was selling. Without prompting he offered to sell for $2700 US. At the end of the day I realized the the work on the hull inside and out (stringers, spider cracks & osmosis) put the boat out of my comfort zone. I'll be patient and keep an eye out for a boat with the stringers already looked after on either side of the border. Waterlogged, thanks again for your help. If you don't mind I may send a few more boats for your perusal in the months to come.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by PineLakeRumble View Post
              Waterlogged, I had a chance to see the boat and learned a lot. I appreciated your earlier checklist. The seller was great. He allowed me to pull up the floor, Turn motor mount bolts, and play with the mechanicals. It had the correct carb and fuel line. The majority of the motor mount bolts still had bite. The carpet and interior was toast but I new that going in. Lots osmosis and spider cracking on the hull. It was obvious that the stringers are due along with the floor and interior. The seller and I got along well and he was open about what he was selling. Without prompting he offered to sell for $2700 US. At the end of the day I realized the the work on the hull inside and out (stringers, spider cracks & osmosis) put the boat out of my comfort zone. I'll be patient and keep an eye out for a boat with the stringers already looked after on either side of the border. Waterlogged, thanks again for your help. If you don't mind I may send a few more boats for your perusal in the months to come.
              Be glad to look again.

              I will say this; nothing about that boat is hard to do, parts are available, and it will be a great learning experience should you decide to take it on.

              It takes time, a place to work with a hoist for lifting and re-setting the engine, tools to get things done, willingness to tackle anything (nothing out of the question), and some funding.

              Thing about stringers is that when you strip the hull, most everything has to be replaced. That is where the expense comes in (the materials to work with wood, epoxy, tools, wiring, upholstery, carpet etc.). Floor, carpet, engine re-set, alignment, and a few new components that would be silly not to replace while it is completely apart (strut bearings, shaft log seal, front and rear transmission seals, damper plate, likely new engine mounts, new cables, new wiring, and I could go on and on. It is never-ending on a rebuild.

              For your interest, look for something not worn out (such as the 86 for example). There are plenty of boats out there.

              As a benchmark, on one particular project I took on, I spent US $1.7K on a project boat (solid engine and that is a must), then another $6.8K in materials as aforementioned.

              I am glad yo hear you had a good experience as you are learning as you go, as did I years ago (and still am). I like straight up people.

              Here is an 84 I am wrapping up now. Been on it since March 2022, a little at a time.

              Old engine coming out.

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              Last edited by waterlogged882; 09-18-2022, 07:22 PM.
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              • #22
                I certainly hear you regarding the initial investment vs. final cost. For instance, this boat looks very clean and well looked after... https://www.kijiji.ca/v-view-details...dId=1620140167

                If the major repairs have been done (hopefully properly), it might be tough to do it myself for the same money. Is $10k US what you would expect to pay for that boat in your neck of the woods?

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                • #23
                  https://www.kijiji.ca/v-view-details...dId=1620140167

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by PineLakeRumble View Post
                    I certainly hear you regarding the initial investment vs. final cost. For instance, this boat looks very clean and well looked after... https://www.kijiji.ca/v-view-details...dId=1620140167

                    If the major repairs have been done (hopefully properly), it might be tough to do it myself for the same money. Is $10k US what you would expect to pay for that boat in your neck of the woods?
                    Everything is relative. One's interpretation of fully restored can vary from another. Typically, if a fellow has done a full restoration (stringers included and expected) they have photos of the stringer replacement. Maybe not always but you see my point. I have caught many people with their full restoration comment and ask. Stutter and stumble is all I got. I can spot them a mile away and I am near-sighted. Not a full restoration (no stringers) therefore if you pay the 10K then the stringers are bad, you will have to take a loss on the sale or do as we have discussed in this thread. Take it all apart, etc. $$$

                    Be careful what people are describing, what you are getting, and what you may have to further do with buying at risk on someone's word.

                    For 10K as described, yes, that is an OK price. However if a fellow can't show photos, or you see OEM stringers as they came from the factory, it is not fully restored in my dictionary.

                    Also be cognizant of coastal state boats that have been in salt. Walk away. Period. Read that again.

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                    Last edited by waterlogged882; 09-19-2022, 06:48 AM.
                    93 190
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                    John 14:6
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                    • #25
                      The hunt is on. Thanks again for taking the time to share your experience.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by PineLakeRumble View Post
                        If the major repairs have been done (hopefully properly), it might be tough to do it myself for the same money. Is $10k US what you would expect to pay for that boat in your neck of the woods?
                        Tough to do for the same money.... but do you "need" to have that boat? You could go out tomorrow and buy 4 running usable decent looking stars and stripes MC for 4-6K a pop and store them in a nice heated dry shed and not even bother fixing the stringers ever.

                        Or for roughly the same price you could get a nice condition much newer mastercraft that will ski better, be roomier, not need stringers and be a better "boat".

                        But I'm too young to have any real fondness for these boats, if I want a "collectable" I'm going to go back and find a wood nautique.

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                        • #27
                          No, I certainly don't need it. And you're right, if I wanted a nice slalom boat I'd look for another '94 as that project went well and I loved the boat. I sold it to a good friend to pay for the next project ('89 Sanger Barefooter). We spend the majority of our time barefooting and my Sanger is a great fit for that. I guess I just miss that wet carbureted V8 rumble and I've always loved that vintage of MC. It does feel good to invest the time and make one of the older boats shine again. In my neck of the woods 79-86 skiers are becoming less common and are often ridiculously overpriced. It would be nice to find one that has new stringers but still needs completing. I'll be keeping my eyes open for the next project in the New Year. Once my basement remodel is complete I'll feel much less guilty about spending money on a new distraction and start the search in earnest. For now, back to studs and drywall!

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                          • #28
                            Maybe what I need to do is get my deposit in for waterlogged's next stringer project!

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by PineLakeRumble View Post
                              No, I certainly don't need it. And you're right, if I wanted a nice slalom boat I'd look for another '94 as that project went well and I loved the boat. I sold it to a good friend to pay for the next project ('89 Sanger Barefooter). We spend the majority of our time barefooting and my Sanger is a great fit for that. I guess I just miss that wet carbureted V8 rumble and I've always loved that vintage of MC. It does feel good to invest the time and make one of the older boats shine again. In my neck of the woods 79-86 skiers are becoming less common and are often ridiculously overpriced. It would be nice to find one that has new stringers but still needs completing. I'll be keeping my eyes open for the next project in the New Year. Once my basement remodel is complete I'll feel much less guilty about spending money on a new distraction and start the search in earnest. For now, back to studs and drywall!
                              If you're handy, and have the space, don't fear a stringer replacement. I did one before + the transom on that particular boat... not a bunch like our resident expert(s)... but I've been there before on a '76 non-MC.

                              What I will say is this: it takes time and effort, but in all honesty, not a ton of funds (relatively speaking) in case thats what's scaring you... if you enjoy the work, the investment for the stringers really isn't bad at all if you're already planning carpet, upholstery, etc. Where cost adds up is if you weren't already planning on those... as you will most assuredly want to do them afterwards.

                              If you don't enjoy the work though, you will regret it a few weeks after starting... you won't necessarily be out a ton financially, but you'll have a torn apart boat growing flowers in your driveway, with next to zero buyers, because... well... its, torn apart.

                              Only you know your level of commitment.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by 86Skier View Post
                                If you don't enjoy the work though, you will regret it a few weeks after starting... you won't necessarily be out a ton financially, but you'll have a torn apart boat growing flowers in your driveway, with next to zero buyers, because... well... its, torn apart.

                                Only you know your level of commitment.
                                In my family we call it a pregnancy because once you start the project you're in for 9 months of hard work plus 18 years of having it sitting around.

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