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  • Heated garage

    I am going to pull my boat out this weekend. It is a 2019 XT21 with the ilmor 5.7 motor. It is being stored in a heated garage so I was planning to winterize it my self. My plan was to change the oil and filter and drain the water out of the block and store it dry this year, no antifreeze. I changed transmission fluid last year and the impeller. only put a little over 60 hrs on it so I think they should be ok. Any thoughts on storing the boat dry instead of pickled ?

  • #2
    IMHO, for the extra 20 minutes and $20 its cheap insurance to put in antifreeze. You would probably be fine without but, hey, you never know.

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    • #3
      Lakedrum, I was thinking the same thing but I have never done the antifreeze by myself before, always had the dealer winterize it so that part of the job would be new to me.

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      • #4
        I was intimidated the first time and than again on my v-drive, but once you do it it's great insurance as opposed to storing dry. Most difficult part is contorting your body to get in some small spots.

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        • #5
          My boat sits in a heated garage, but I still put antifreeze in it just in case.
          2003 ProStar 197, MCX and Powerslot.

          "When injustice becomes law, resistance becomes duty" - Thomas Jefferson
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          • #6
            I went 20 years without putting a drop of antifreeze in my old boats (stored in a non-heated garage) so you'd probably be fine. I'd put some in just for insurance though. This forum actually introduced me to the antifreeze trick... I guess I live under a rock lol.
            -Tolman
            '22 XT23 "Big Kahuna"
            '06 X30 (Sold)

            "Sometimes my genius, it's almost frightening" -JC

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            • #7
              you'll be fine just draining the block, but run a coat hanger or something similar in the drain holes of the exhaust manifolds as there is usually some sediment build-up in there and it keeps all the water from draining otherwise. i keep mine in an attached but unheated garage and have never had any issues.

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              • #8
                Thank you for the replies.

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                • #9
                  So its funny - fully dry is in my opinion the best way to go. I've had times where after winterizing I'm in the unheated barn in January and that partly empty jug of pink antifreeze that says -50 is kind of slushy in the bottle. Meaning maybe the stuff isn't necessarily as high quality as we think.

                  The argument for using pink juice is twofold, first is anti corrosion. I can sort of buy that although green automotive antifreeze is packed full of corrosion inhibitors and pink RV/Marine antifreeze is not, so from that argument it is probably best to drain all the water, fill with 50/50 green automotive antifreeze, then come spring drain and collect that antifreeze into containers and reuse it next year. Then use an antifreeze tester to make sure that its not getting diluted and to make sure that you drain fully and then capture the first bit of flush water in spring so you're not polluting antifreeze.

                  I'm in the drain it fully, then add pink antifreeze camp for one specific reason and that is that I am too lazy to remove all the hoses off the engine and worry water could be sitting in the mufflers. Besides that? Dry to me would be fine.

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                  • #10
                    I do both. I drain the block, run it off the bucket of pink anti-freeze, then drain that and leave it empty for the winter. In my mind, that leaves the least risk. If anything gets left, it is anti-freeze. I will say, when I drain the block of anti-freeze, there is usually a second or two of straight water that comes out first. Obviously that would dilute into the anti-freeze, but it always made me feel better about the dry block.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 88 PS190 View Post
                      So its funny - fully dry is in my opinion the best way to go. I've had times where after winterizing I'm in the unheated barn in January and that partly empty jug of pink antifreeze that says -50 is kind of slushy in the bottle. Meaning maybe the stuff isn't necessarily as high quality as we think.

                      The argument for using pink juice is twofold, first is anti corrosion. I can sort of buy that although green automotive antifreeze is packed full of corrosion inhibitors and pink RV/Marine antifreeze is not, so from that argument it is probably best to drain all the water, fill with 50/50 green automotive antifreeze, then come spring drain and collect that antifreeze into containers and reuse it next year. Then use an antifreeze tester to make sure that its not getting diluted and to make sure that you drain fully and then capture the first bit of flush water in spring so you're not polluting antifreeze.

                      I'm in the drain it fully, then add pink antifreeze camp for one specific reason and that is that I am too lazy to remove all the hoses off the engine and worry water could be sitting in the mufflers. Besides that? Dry to me would be fine.
                      Pretty sure the -50 Deg F specification is for the burst point for validation of testing the solution. That sounds good and is used as a wow factor on the label. The actual freeze point is much less, thus the slushy solution you mention.

                      There are multiple factors with the effectiveness of antifreeze/coolant solution(s). Kind of like an oil topic. A dead horse has no chance of resurrection on either topic of discussion.

                      .
                      93 190
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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by waterlogged882 View Post
                        Pretty sure the -50 Deg F specification is for the burst point for validation of testing the solution.
                        .
                        That but it is also meant to be in flexible pex tubing.

                        I suppose my point is if we think the point of antifreeze is corrosion the stuff doesn't have corrosion inhibitors.

                        If we think the point is water displacement it doesn't tolerate dilution well and will freeze easily if dilluted.



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                        • #13
                          As waterlogged states this a oil thread for sure. Being in Michigan with our winters it's antifreeze for me and the boats I do for friends. If they don't want to spring for the antifreeze then I'm out and they're welcome to winterize the boat anyway they want but without me. I have no desire to be part of a possible failed winterization for a couple bucks.

                          If you're already draining the block, manifolds and blowing out the heater core you already have all the hoses off you need. I typically drain everything, blow out the line going to the heater core then button everything up except the bung on the engine for the heater. I pour antifreeze down the line for the heater and blow that through to ensure the heater core has antifreeze in it. I then pull off the easiest line to get to off the thermostat housing and fill the block through the heater bung on the block. When the antifreeze comes out of the thermostat housing or out the exhaust the block is full. Put the 2 hoses back on and you're done. For extra credit I'll do a quick start on the engine for a couple seconds to circulate the antifreeze in the cooling system. If you get more than a quart of antifreeze out the exhaust your running it too long. I've had great luck with this process over the last 20+ years.

                          All this said this is the system I use and with this topic there seems to be quite a bit of differences and beliefs. You are by all means welcome to use whatever works for you.

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                          • #14
                            waterlogged882 whether it freezes or not is not actually important, it's whether it expands when it freezes, I would guess the pink RV antifreeze as it's not expected to run during cold weather like a car cooling system, just doesn't expand much when frozen

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                            • #15
                              I know I have seen this before but can someone post a checklist for winterizing a ilmor 5.7

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