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Neighbor's Cottage for Sale - South Central Wisconsin

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  • #31
    Originally posted by MC25 View Post
    Strawman
    Hardly. My comp was same square footage and circa $250k at the time.

    Yours was not comparable at all.

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by snork View Post
      when I hear Wisconsin real estate this is what comes to mind
      https://teamtalk.mastercraft.com/sho...ight=wisconsin
      not that it really matters to me, never selling the family lake house in northern Wisconsin but the markets way too soft for an asking price of $325k, IMHO $250k is a far reach for a tiny old cabin with tiny bdrms and that closet kitchen.
      man i wish i would have known about that one.. I am close to there, beautiful area for all seasons. Don't know much about bass lake but man that is nice. I also have worked with that realtor over the years.

      Comment


      • #33
        4 acres on the lake I am on, 5000 sqft house that needs a complete reno to update it is going for 1.4 mil...

        My neighbor just paid 450k for his 1600 sqft house that was on the water with a 0.25 acre lot and his house required about 100k of renovations to get it updated to decent levels.

        Property taxes up here are also crazy. My property taxes will probably be somewhere around $10,000 a year.

        Comment


        • #34
          In Wisconsin prices vary wildly based entirely on the name of the lake. As a good rule of thumb when looking at property the taxes are real close to $1,000 per $100,000 of value determined by the tax assessor, who in most cases is a private entity. A study was just released that ranked Wisconsin at number five for property tax rates.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by mustangtexas View Post
            In Wisconsin prices vary wildly based entirely on the name of the lake. As a good rule of thumb when looking at property the taxes are real close to $1,000 per $100,000 of value determined by the tax assessor, who in most cases is a private entity. A study was just released that ranked Wisconsin at number five for property tax rates.
            WI has been around #5 for a long time and it sucks. Milwaukee County taxes are significantly higher than in the rest of the state, too. I should have bought outside of the county.

            Comment


            • #36
              Tax bills in our WI town went up 11% this year......

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by Mastercraftdave View Post
                Wow that is a crazy price for such a small place....

                We built a 4 bed/4bath house on a huge water front lot in Mississippi with 80ft water front including docking and boat house for that same price.

                Even better, we boat year round. Man I love the South

                There's a reason for that. One place is in Mississippi and this is in Wisconsin.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by sseager View Post
                  Tax bills in our WI town went up 11% this year......
                  Gov. Tony Evers just vetoed another tax decrease proposed by the legislature here. Shocking that taxes are going up with a big gov't democratic former mayor of Milwaukee running things-NOT

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by rbuss4 View Post
                    Gov. Tony Evers just vetoed another tax decrease proposed by the legislature here. Shocking that taxes are going up with a big gov't democratic former mayor of Milwaukee running things-NOT
                    Evers was never a Mayor- he was secretary of public education. He wants to dump the excess tax revenue into the public schools, but if anyone thinks that will work in Milwaukee is on drugs- the 2019 budget for that train wreck was $1.4 Billion for about 78,000 students. The whole city’s budget was about $1.5 Billion.

                    Edit- Milwaukee has had four elected Mayors since 1948 and one interim Mayor, because John O Norquist left office early because of a scandal. The first of the four was Socialist in office for 12 years) and MKE is the last major city in the country to have one.

                    The link shows political party for all of Milwaukee's Mayors and it shows one of the reasons this city is in its current condition-

                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...s_of_Milwaukee

                    People complain about Republicans in MKE but this city hasn't had a Republican Mayor in 104 years.
                    Last edited by JimN; 02-29-2020, 08:10 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Take the property on the OP move it 30 miles south to lake mendota and it's a 1.05-1.1 million dollar property without hitting the market.

                      our taxes on a dane county lake went up 26% this year! we made no improvements. the assessment went up 0.5%.

                      don't get me started on the waste that is the madison school district. Here is an excellent article from the wall street journal. likely only applicable to wisconsin at this point, but when Sanders and his likely VP warren win, it will apply to the country.

                      The unofficial theme of Elizabeth Warren’s presidential campaign is that the Massachusetts senator has a plan for everything. Last month Ms. Warren’s campaign revealed the details of her plan for K-12 education, which would increase federal funding for public schools by $800 billion over 10 years, strengthen teachers unions, and halt the growth of public charter schools.
                      Ms. Warren’s website says her plan would “ensure that every student has access to a meaningful, high-quality public education.” But this approach to education has already been tried in the progressive utopia of Madison, Wis., and it is failing the city’s most vulnerable students.

                      The Madison Metropolitan School District is a progressive dream, spending an average of $15,241 on each of its more than 27,000 students. That’s a higher per pupil price tag than any comparably sized district in Wisconsin. Despite this avalanche of cash, Madison schools are in crisis, plagued by one of the worst racial achievement gaps in the state and perhaps the country.
                      Last month, results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress showed that Wisconsin again has the nation’s widest achievement gap between black and white students. To put this in perspective, Wisconsin’s African-American eighth-graders are performing only slightly better than white fourth-graders in both reading and math.


                      Of the Wisconsin school districts with an achievement gap, Madison’s is one of the worst. According to 2018-19 Forward Exam scores, only 34.9% of Madison students are proficient in English, well below the statewide average of 40.9%. But in Madison only 10% of African-American students are proficient in English, compared with 57.2% of white students. Only 79% of African-American students graduate from Madison public high schools within five years, compared with 94% of white students.


                      Those who graduate aren’t necessarily better off. Parents say there is no accountability when the district graduates students it has failed to educate. “Yes our black kids are being left behind,” says Jewel Adams, whose son graduated from La Follette High School in 2016. “They are getting passed along without the knowledge they need to be passed along with.”

                      The racial disparity in Madison extends to school safety. The Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty recently examined emergency calls to 911 originating from Madison public schools and found that black students are more likely than whites to attend dangerous schools. Brandon Alvarez graduated in 2018 from La Follette, where there was one 911 call per seven students from August 2012 to May 2019. His sister started high school this year and he advised his parents to take advantage of Wisconsin’s open-enrollment program and send her to school in another district. “I told my dad it wouldn’t be a good idea for my sister to go to La Follette,” says Mr. Alvarez. “She should go to a district that focuses more on academics and is safer.” Mr. Alvarez drives his sister to high school each day in neighboring Monona Grove.


                      Even as Madison’s students are suffering, its teachers union is thriving. In 2011, Gov. Scott Walker’s Act 10 handicapped public unions by getting rid of compulsory membership. Yet, motivated in part by anti-Walker sentiment, Madison’s teachers union remains strong. Act 10 requires unions to be recertified each year, and in 2018 around 80% of teachers voted to keep their union.

                      The district’s leaders have moved the school system to the left. A recently enacted policy prohibits teachers from telling parents if their child wants to change genders, unless the student grants the teacher permission to do so. The seven-member school board has also worked to limit school choice. Its efforts have contributed to 87% of students attending a traditional public school, as opposed to a charter school or other options. In a city with a population of nearly 260,000, there are only two charter schools and three private schools taking part in the state’s school-voucher program. The city is a school-choice desert.

                      In Milwaukee, by contrast more than 40% of students attend a school other than a traditional public one. Milwaukee charter students outperform those in traditional public schools by 13% in math and 12% in English, accounting for socioeconomic factors such as family income and disability status. Students in choice schools are 4% more likely to graduate high school, according to research by the University of Arkansas Department of Education Reform, and they’re also less likely to engage in criminal activity.

                      Ms. Warren says she wants to help America’s students access high-quality public education, but her plan would trap low-income minority students in unsafe, poor-performing schools, denying them the opportunity to learn. Progressive education utopias always look better on paper than in real life. If Ms. Warren really wants to help students learn, she ought to change her plan.

                      Mr. Szafir is executive vice president and Ms. Petersen is a writer and research associate at the Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Wow, this thread took some wild twists and turns!

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by XC500mod View Post
                          Take the property on the OP move it 30 miles south to lake mendota and it's a 1.05-1.1 million dollar property without hitting the market.

                          our taxes on a dane county lake went up 26% this year! we made no improvements. the assessment went up 0.5%.

                          don't get me started on the waste that is the madison school district. Here is an excellent article from the wall street journal. likely only applicable to wisconsin at this point, but when Sanders and his likely VP warren win, it will apply to the country.

                          The unofficial theme of Elizabeth Warren’s presidential campaign is that the Massachusetts senator has a plan for everything. Last month Ms. Warren’s campaign revealed the details of her plan for K-12 education, which would increase federal funding for public schools by $800 billion over 10 years, strengthen teachers unions, and halt the growth of public charter schools.
                          Ms. Warren’s website says her plan would “ensure that every student has access to a meaningful, high-quality public education.” But this approach to education has already been tried in the progressive utopia of Madison, Wis., and it is failing the city’s most vulnerable students.

                          The Madison Metropolitan School District is a progressive dream, spending an average of $15,241 on each of its more than 27,000 students. That’s a higher per pupil price tag than any comparably sized district in Wisconsin. Despite this avalanche of cash, Madison schools are in crisis, plagued by one of the worst racial achievement gaps in the state and perhaps the country.
                          Last month, results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress showed that Wisconsin again has the nation’s widest achievement gap between black and white students. To put this in perspective, Wisconsin’s African-American eighth-graders are performing only slightly better than white fourth-graders in both reading and math.


                          Of the Wisconsin school districts with an achievement gap, Madison’s is one of the worst. According to 2018-19 Forward Exam scores, only 34.9% of Madison students are proficient in English, well below the statewide average of 40.9%. But in Madison only 10% of African-American students are proficient in English, compared with 57.2% of white students. Only 79% of African-American students graduate from Madison public high schools within five years, compared with 94% of white students.


                          Those who graduate aren’t necessarily better off. Parents say there is no accountability when the district graduates students it has failed to educate. “Yes our black kids are being left behind,” says Jewel Adams, whose son graduated from La Follette High School in 2016. “They are getting passed along without the knowledge they need to be passed along with.”

                          The racial disparity in Madison extends to school safety. The Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty recently examined emergency calls to 911 originating from Madison public schools and found that black students are more likely than whites to attend dangerous schools. Brandon Alvarez graduated in 2018 from La Follette, where there was one 911 call per seven students from August 2012 to May 2019. His sister started high school this year and he advised his parents to take advantage of Wisconsin’s open-enrollment program and send her to school in another district. “I told my dad it wouldn’t be a good idea for my sister to go to La Follette,” says Mr. Alvarez. “She should go to a district that focuses more on academics and is safer.” Mr. Alvarez drives his sister to high school each day in neighboring Monona Grove.


                          Even as Madison’s students are suffering, its teachers union is thriving. In 2011, Gov. Scott Walker’s Act 10 handicapped public unions by getting rid of compulsory membership. Yet, motivated in part by anti-Walker sentiment, Madison’s teachers union remains strong. Act 10 requires unions to be recertified each year, and in 2018 around 80% of teachers voted to keep their union.

                          The district’s leaders have moved the school system to the left. A recently enacted policy prohibits teachers from telling parents if their child wants to change genders, unless the student grants the teacher permission to do so. The seven-member school board has also worked to limit school choice. Its efforts have contributed to 87% of students attending a traditional public school, as opposed to a charter school or other options. In a city with a population of nearly 260,000, there are only two charter schools and three private schools taking part in the state’s school-voucher program. The city is a school-choice desert.

                          In Milwaukee, by contrast more than 40% of students attend a school other than a traditional public one. Milwaukee charter students outperform those in traditional public schools by 13% in math and 12% in English, accounting for socioeconomic factors such as family income and disability status. Students in choice schools are 4% more likely to graduate high school, according to research by the University of Arkansas Department of Education Reform, and they’re also less likely to engage in criminal activity.

                          Ms. Warren says she wants to help America’s students access high-quality public education, but her plan would trap low-income minority students in unsafe, poor-performing schools, denying them the opportunity to learn. Progressive education utopias always look better on paper than in real life. If Ms. Warren really wants to help students learn, she ought to change her plan.

                          Mr. Szafir is executive vice president and Ms. Petersen is a writer and research associate at the Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty.

                          so, you're not in the market for a WI cabin then? LOL

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by rbuss4 View Post
                            Gov. Tony Evers just vetoed another tax decrease proposed by the legislature here. Shocking that taxes are going up with a big gov't democratic former mayor of Milwaukee running things-NOT
                            EXACTLY. After many years of decreasing property taxes with a real gov, we get this clown.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by RxMC View Post
                              There's a reason for that. One place is in Mississippi and this is in Wisconsin.
                              You may see one state being better than the other but I also look at use. Our place is used year round, to the extent that I didn't even winterize the boat this season. You maybe get 4-5 months of use out of a place in Wisconsin?

                              Based on what I have read, I'm not so sure that Wisconsin is better off than Mississippi.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Mastercraftdave View Post
                                You may see one state being better than the other but I also look at use. Our place is used year round, to the extent that I didn't even winterize the boat this season. You maybe get 4-5 months of use out of a place in Wisconsin?

                                Based on what I have read, I'm not so sure that Wisconsin is better off than Mississippi.
                                Typical boating season is Memorial Day to Labor day, although some are more willing to go in earlier and pull out later- depends on the year. End of October is about when the last boats come out in SE Wisconsin but up North, they need to come out earlier unless the owner is willing to drain everything after each use before Winterization.

                                Comment

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