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  • Teak Rear Platform Restoration

    Hi, I just know that there have been thread/s on refurbishing a teak platform. I have searched using various word permutations and get 11 pages!!!!

    I have sanded mine right down and given several coats of teak oil. When wet it looks fabulous. Now dry it looks OKish but very flat in terms of shine/ finish .

    Platform is still used by novice skiers who in spite of repeated telling drag their ski skegs across the platform. Furthermore even without ski damage the oil seems to wash out fairly quickly.

    So can anybody point me to the definitive thread on teak platform maintenance
    Thanks
    Ian

  • #2
    I use a mixture of tru oil and mineral spirits. Works good

    Sent from my SM-G981U using Tapatalk

    Comment


    • #3
      Here's how it looks

      https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink/top...ink_source=app

      Sent from my SM-G981U using Tapatalk

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by eurosysytem0 View Post
        Hi, I just know that there have been thread/s on refurbishing a teak platform. I have searched using various word permutations and get 11 pages!!!!

        I have sanded mine right down and given several coats of teak oil. When wet it looks fabulous. Now dry it looks OKish but very flat in terms of shine/ finish .

        Platform is still used by novice skiers who in spite of repeated telling drag their ski skegs across the platform. Furthermore even without ski damage the oil seems to wash out fairly quickly.

        So can anybody point me to the definitive thread on teak platform maintenance
        Thanks
        Ian
        Search for the one from TMCNo1. It's been a while but my god that one looked like it had a glass coating.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by stuartmcnair View Post
          Search for the one from TMCNo1. It's been a while but my god that one looked like it had a glass coating.
          Did a search on Username TMCNo1. No match. Must be too old

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by eurosysytem0 View Post
            Did a search on Username TMCNo1. No match. Must be too old
            Not to worry. You aren't missing anything except a slick and bling type finish for show.

            So take this for what it is worth to you. I have been a proponent of this for many years.

            ************

            I prefer and recommend the mixture of linseed oil (75%) and mineral spirits (25%).

            So for the sell first:
            I use boiled linseed oil from the local box store and mix it with mineral spirits as stated above. The linseed oil (with the 25% dilution of mineral spirits) is significantly less oily and messy in several ways. Once the board is done and you put it in the lake, there is noticeably less oil residue that is offloaded in the water. Good news on that front but that also means less oil on the seat of your shorts and/your feet to transfer back into the boat. That is a winner for me. I really like this mixture over any of the brand teak oils (per se').

            Another thing is that this mix will last all summer (unless you're just a slob and a pig on the board) and easily into the next season. One thing I do after each day's use (I store my boat in the garage) is to wipe it lightly with 303 Aerospace UV protectant. I buy the 303 by the gallon and a gallon lasts for several seasons. A mere wipe-down across the board and it keeps a shine there all season. Maybe that is an old wives tale but if it is, I made it up. It works nonetheless.

            Board Prep:


            If the board is really in a mess, you may prefer to sand the board (slotted boards come apart fairly easily) to a smooth and clean surface. This will prep the wood for the treatment very well.

            If the board is in fairly good shape, I prefer to pressure wash it in a light manner, just enough pressure to clean the black mold spore out of the seams and cracks of the wood. I also have handy a pressure washer here so that makes it easy too. Sanding and manual labor does not appeal to me in this case.

            Materials:
            • One quart can (will be way too much but is readily available) of boiled linseed oil (less oily than the raw oil).
            • One quart (or your choice of quantity) of mineral spirits.
            • A cheap dollar store liquid measuring cup ( I prefer the larger two-cup capacity). Plastic or glass will work. They are reusable from year to year.
            • A box of 12 (or one single) 3" wide cheap chip brush (I get them by the box at Harbor Freight and dispose properly).
            • A couple or four shop towels. Paper towels will leave paper trails where a shop cloth will not shed (another Harbor Freight item).


            Setup:

            A couple of saw horses or milk crates. Saw horses are higher and more comfortable to work at.
            A sunny day with low humidity is ideal; 65-75 degrees F and 40-75% humidity. Sun and warm temps are the essential needs. Humidity is flexible.

            Preparation:


            Mix 75/25 in a one cup solution. This will be plenty for most boards. You'll probably not use an entire cup. It goes a long way.
            Have your board laid out on the saw horses and your shop cloth and brush ready.

            Application:


            How hard is this to figure out? Brush it on. I personally like to keep the board in a shady spot until I am ready to apply the mixture. Like I said, brush it on relatively evenly distributed.

            Don't worry about the color. It is going to be what it will be when the oil is applied. You won't have a choice of light or dark. Just put it on and let it set in the sun.

            Here is the trick to success with this entire process. Do not deviate one bit. I have done this a lot and have learned a lot from my mistakes. Take advantage of my lessons learned.

            Let the first coat set for 08-11 minutes...no longer than 11. With the shop cloth, wipe it as dry as you can. Do not leave the solution on there to soak in. It will not.

            I'll say it again; Apply / wait 08-11 minutes / wipe it off completely, as dry as possible.

            Leave the board in the sun for several hours (2-4) and take the board in for the day and let it dry for minimum of 24 hours. Do not deviate from this.


            Next day or next "best time" flip the board over and do the same thing to the opposite side. Exactly the same steps. When you flip it over you'll be tempted to put a towel or cloth on the rails of the saw horse. Don't do it. Just lay it on the rails like they are.

            The trick here is that I start with the back side of the board on day 1 then flip it for the back side to sit on the rails and do the top side last day. If any mark or evidence of a saw horse rail is present, it won't matter because the marks (insignificant if any at all) will be on the bottom.

            So now you have both sides treated. Nine times out of ten I never go a second coat. The board really gains no additional luster or value and the mixture is more of a mess than a treatment with "more is better."

            If you are inclined to stray away from this advice and add a second coat (again, rarely needed) then brush it on using the same process and regiment, except on the second coat, do not leave it on for more than 3-5 minutes. Read that again..... Three to 5 minutes. Immediately and quickly wipe it dry and let it set for 24 hours. Same thing for the opposite side.

            Here's what happens on the second coat:

            Teak is not an open grain or porous wood. The mixture will treat the surface of the wood as it allows. The mix will not soak in (so don't wait hours for it to go away) and it will soon turn to a sticky mess. Takes days or weeks to get it back in shape and I have seen a time it took a scrub brush to re-clean it and start over.

            Do not wait any longer than the prescribed times I have recommended. You will end up with a disappointing mess to clean up. After the wipe-down, sun is essential. Plan ahead (for best weather enhancements).

            This mixture is my favorite over Star-bright brand, Gold Bond itch powder, or anything else. You may prefer otherwise and that is OK too. This is just my $0.02 for consideration. If anyone has another recommendation or method/product, come on out with it. It's always good to hear what others have had success with.

            After a day or weekend of use, wipe it lightly with 303, put a shine on it, and admire your work all summer long. This finish will hold up to the rigor of daily use.

            Follow these instructions and you'll have a great looking board.

            .
            Attached Files
            93 190
            (safe click)

            Comment


            • #7
              I can also attest that the instructions and timing need to be followed closely - having been rushed in my 2020 season prep, i was left with suboptimal results for the season. I had a challenge finding a sunny day when I had working time (not so easy in spring up here in the north) during the beginning of the COVID crisis. For '21 I'll consider keeping the platform at home to finish even if we splash the boat early.

              Waterlogged, how do you dispose of the rags - fireproof container, or burn immediately?

              Thanks again for the well laid out process. I don't at all miss the days of trying to work thru cleaning, sanding, and Star Brite.

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              • #8
                Great step by step instruction, thanks! I'll try it out when it warms up in the spring....
                - Jeff

                1994 205, LT1

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                • #9
                  For me use the star brit teak cleaner, then the brightener and then hit it with a D/A sander and 80 grit. If it's still not looking bright hit it with the cleaner and brightener a second time.

                  After that, then just use the 80/20 linseed oil mineral spirits mix. Put it on with a 4 inch wide cheap paint brush, one coat and put it in the sun; when it dries to the touch put a second coat on and you are done.

                  I did use Harold's method once, just once. It was too slick to even put in the water. Great for shows but not practical for use.
                  Last edited by CantRepeat; 10-31-2020, 05:19 AM.
                  -Tim

                  Making boomers great again!! Boomin'

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Waterlogged,
                    Do you prefer the new style “solid” platform over the original?
                    Asking because Teak World gave me the option of either for the same price.
                    Ordering in the next few weeks and interested in any input the group has for me.
                    Thanks


                    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BigGixxerFixxer View Post
                      Waterlogged,
                      Do you prefer the new style “solid” platform over the original?
                      Asking because Teak World gave me the option of either for the same price.
                      Ordering in the next few weeks and interested in any input the group has for me.
                      Thanks


                      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                      I prefer the new solid board. It's a little larger and just an overall nicer piece of real estate. The OEM brackets work just fine.

                      If your OEM board becomes available, I have a project now where I may could use it.

                      .
                      93 190
                      (safe click)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by waterlogged882 View Post
                        I prefer the new solid board. It's a little larger and just an overall nicer piece of real estate. The OEM brackets work just fine.

                        If your OEM board becomes available, I have a project now where I may could use it.

                        .

                        10-4
                        Larger in both dimensions?
                        Mine has a broken top slat with several other impending failures.
                        Love the look of the original but it seems like the solid deck might be more robust.
                        If I decide to cut it loose I’ll let you know.
                        Appreciate the insight


                        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by CantRepeat View Post
                          For me use the star brit teak cleaner, then the brightener and then hit it with a day and 80 grit.
                          That's all I did. Nothing more. I like the natural blonde look, not like it's been painted or varnished.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BigGixxerFixxer View Post
                            10-4
                            Larger in both dimensions?
                            Mine has a broken top slat with several other impending failures.
                            Love the look of the original but it seems like the solid deck might be more robust.
                            If I decide to cut it loose I’ll let you know.
                            Appreciate the insight


                            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                            It is a little larger in width from transom toward rope length.

                            I found several boards in a warehouse so this (shown) was not made to necessarily fit my 93 190. The new boards I found had X-1 marked with a Sharpie on the back side. The curvature /radius fits my 190, as there are a lot of same-fit radius dimensions (interchangeably) on these era transoms. This also fits a 205, etc. My point is this; confirm the dimensions you have in mind when you order. The below dimensions fit my 190 just fine, using the OEM brackets.

                            OEM = 17.5"
                            New style = 21.25"

                            I measured this morning. Sorry for the quick draft drawing.

                            There is maybe less than an inch difference in other directional dimensions but the width (as shown) is noticeable. Seems like an extra half acre.

                            .
                            Attached Files
                            Last edited by waterlogged882; 10-31-2020, 10:01 AM.
                            93 190
                            (safe click)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Can't top Waterlogged's post, and I agree 100%. I used #1's method at one point. It looked and looked great.

                              But keep in mind - he wouldn't let anyone on his platform with a ski. Including me. I had to put my ski on from my own boat when he took me for a run. #1's method also left the solid platforms dangerously slippery. (Ask the owner of Charlotte Ski Boats - he took a huge fall off my platform right after shoulder surgery) The slotted platforms were "ok" because there is more friction, if you will. Sort of the same reason tiled shower floors are almost always small tiles. You need the friction of the grout lines.

                              Personally I have had both styles of platform, and I prefer the solid vs. slotted platform.
                              Prior boats - (3) X14's, (3) Prostars, and a Tristar.

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