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  • #16
    Originally posted by MIskiboat View Post
    Go to Big lots or ollies and get some cheap bathroom / rubber backed floor mats.
    Only use once or twice a year but invaluable for risk prevention…..
    That's a good idea. My normal combination of plastic and cardboard always seems to move around.

    Now I need to figure out how to complete a simple project without climbing in and out of the boat 20 times...
    2001 Prostar 209

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    • #17
      i do all of it but paid someone else to do gelcoat fixes a few years ago. i feel the same way about car projects - enjoy doing whatever mechanical, pay the pros to do the bodywork

      havent had to do an engine or trans rebuild in the boat, but have done plenty on car projects. when youre not in a rush and the rebuild journey is part of the fun, i find mechanical stuff to be entertaining. becomes less fun when theres a deadline or some kind of $ involved.

      Originally posted by Exotic_Matter View Post
      Now I need to figure out how to complete a simple project without climbing in and out of the boat 20 times...
      agreed! my least favorite part of boat work.

      this probably wont work for the much taller new boats, but for the older stuff i find keeping an adjustable height tool table nearby with a few more tools than i think ill need usually works out

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      • #18
        We're supposed to change the oil?? All these years I've just been adding oil as it gets low.
        “You realize your odds of winning the lottery are the same as being mauled by a polar bear and a regular bear in the same day”….E-Trade Baby.

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        • #19
          Basically the only jobs I try to avoid now are trailer axle work and hull polishing.

          Mostly because what I've discovered is that the trailer axle shops pay so little for the parts a full axle and springs installed costs me little more than the parts. And similarly the whole cut and polish of a hull isn't terribly expensive in the grand scheme but it is a bit tedious to do myself.

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          • #20
            Boat I do all the work/maintenance on it. Part of its cost plus it’s pretty easy to do. Plus it’s usually just a once a year thing.

            Vehicles is a different story. I only change air filters and fuel filter on diesel truck. Again these are easy to do and way cheaper to do myself. Dealer wants $250 for a fuel filter change it’s $50 in parts and takes about 15 mins. Would do more but it’s a time thing with two young kids it’s hard to find the time for some things.


            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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            • #21
              I'll do the basics on both, up to and including brake pads, rotors, etc.

              I WILL NOT change the oil in my 5.3 liter Chevy Avalanche. I refuse based on past experiences. What engineer in their right mind would put the oil drain bolt horizontal? Close to a cross member. And leave no space to get around the filter. Not worth my aggravation.
              If its not a competition ski boat, its always second best.

              2008 MasterCraft X14, LY6, 400 HP
              1994 MasterCraft ProStar 205 (SOLD)

              Check out MasterCraft Buckeye Bash on Facebook!

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              • #22
                Interesting options.

                Other than complete motor/gearbox removal I do all my own work on the boat. I have the space, the tools, and wifi in the shed for YouTube - what more do I need? Put the TV on sport, light the fire, crack a beer, close the shed door and I am in paradise..

                I also found from previous boats that keeping a complete file of all work done, receipts, photos, and manual has far higher value to a buyer on an older boat than a dealer service record.
                Then I find the dealers are over priced ( $120 for a $19 fuel filter and $150/hr labour charge), and on the occasion that I have had to use my local Mastercraft dealer, I have had to wait 3-4 weeks to get in and they are only interested in fleecing as much money from me as possible. Got told that us "Older" Mastercraft owners are tight a$$'s and they prefer not to work on older boats...

                Doing my own work saves a ton of money, I know it is done right or I outsource to local engineering companies if beyond my skills. I am also over an hour from any marine mechanic, and where we ski is 4 hours, and the lake is too big to take chances. If anything goes wrong I want to know I can either fix it myself to get back on the water asap, or know what I need to do to get it fixed asap.

                On our older vehicles I also do basic maintenance work like oil changes, brake pads, filters, wipers, etc, but the newer ones are still under warranty and fixed price servicing so they go to the dealer.
                Cheers

                Mark

                '99 Mastercraft ProStar 205 330-LTR

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                • #23
                  My father (85 yr old) myself, and my boy have been licensed technicians all our lives. Owned our own businesses. I like to think there isn't anything we can't service. I find it very relaxing and interesting maintaining the boats we own. Many friends have said to me at times " you ever gonna put that in the lake or just polish it ?"
                  I polished my 1976 half ton truck so many times the paint faded . Course I was a newby at it then.
                  If she don't shine , she ain't mine

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Double D View Post
                    I'll do the basics on both, up to and including brake pads, rotors, etc.



                    I WILL NOT change the oil in my 5.3 liter Chevy Avalanche. I refuse based on past experiences. What engineer in their right mind would put the oil drain bolt horizontal? Close to a cross member. And leave no space to get around the filter. Not worth my aggravation.
                    Lol.. my 2013 f150. Horizontal oil filter and horizontal drain bolt with a cross member.. on the 2013 escape horizontal filter and surrounded by some oil plumbing... need ultra small hands to get filter off... at least I know my filter installed properly and I get oil I want... shall we discuss our automotive oil choices? [emoji1787][emoji1787][emoji1787]

                    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
                    sigpic...A bad day water skiing still beats a good day at work...1995 Pro Star 205....

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                    • #25
                      I do all of my own work on all my vehicles and boat. Boat dealer prices are ridiculous and they are long wait times. With two kids now, I have been motivated to get newer vehicles so I have to work on them less.

                      Sent from my SM-G973U1 using Tapatalk

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                      • #26
                        Boats, snowmobiles, side x side, power equipnent, etc I do all preventative maintenance and most repair. Had to back when I was poor and had to work on them. Now I find it relaxing and, in most cases, by the time I schedule/drop off/pick up I can have it done myself.

                        Vehicles....I do brakes and small/easy stuff like sensors/filters. I own a scan tool. I don't do oil changes cuz bulk oil is cheaper plus disposal and prep/cleanup/accessibility/time spent doesn't make sense.

                        Sent from my SM-G960U1 using Tapatalk
                        Everyone Dies, but not everyone lives

                        2004 Prostar 197, ACME 843

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                        • #27
                          Like most commenting I also do all the maintenance items on my cars and boats. I'll also tackle electrical, anything on the trailer, light gel coat work, paint work and stereo projects on the boat as well a minor to mid level mechanical repairs but will farm out repairs I don't have the tools or facilities/infrastructure (garage, lift, specialty tools) to perform. Pretty much the same on the cars.

                          For the most part my cars are all newer and don't take much maintenance or repair. The 70 Mach 1 I bought this spring is a different story and seems to always need something tighten, adjusted or replaced.

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                          • #28
                            I do all the maintenance work and minor repairs on my boat and cars, really enjoy the sense of accomplishment, can see what you got done versus my day job sitting at a keyboard

                            I enjoy doing mechanical things but I have someone else buff & wax boat as that is more art than mechanics for me
                            2021 XT22 - Current
                            2017 XT20 - Sold
                            2008 Malibu VTX - Sold

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                            • #29
                              I do the basics myself and (knock on wood) so far have not had anything more than that to work on! I have actually been showing/telling quite a few people how to winterize their boats lately and do some minor maintenance along the way.

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                              • #30
                                I do it all except glass and gel work.

                                Why, I enjoy it.

                                Besides, I'm not paying someone $800 to winterize my boat!
                                -Tim

                                Making boomers great again!! Boomin'

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