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New Interstate Marine 24M-XHD batteries

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  • 3event
    replied
    2nd vote for COSTCO. Great prices on Interstate batteries. I just picked up a 27F for our Sequoia this week and it was $98 (710cca)

    Leave a comment:


  • Loewen
    replied
    If you don't want to spend the $$$ for lithium, at least step up to size 31 AGM's. Sam's Club sells Duracell 31 AGM's w/ 1000 MCA for cheap cheap. Great batteries and you'll never run out of play time on the tunes, even if floating around all day. Fantastic batteries and half the price of Interstate AGM's.

    Add a Minn Kota Precision 2 bank charger and those batteries are going to last a LOOOONG time.

    Leave a comment:


  • hunter991
    replied
    you can buy ANY battery. they are almost all made at 5 different mfg's or at least that was the way it was back when. I use the cheap walmart of farm and fleet batteries and they hold up very well. never disappointed. If you take care of them they will last a long time. The walmarts i have i my bass boat (deep cyl) and they are still good after 5 years. Probably get another two years out of them and i use them all the time for trolling motors etc..

    Leave a comment:


  • Tsumi
    replied
    Originally posted by JimN View Post
    It's a long read, but this should be a consideration-

    https://www.nfpa.org/-/media/Files/N...ieshazard.ashx

    For cranking, they're not really necessary. For house batteries, they're barely necessary if the cost is factored into the application. If these boats had electric motors and were regularly recharged, it would be a different conversation.
    It's also pretty outdated, being a 2011 article. It also focuses primarily on lithium-ion batteries, but LFP batteries are much more stable and less flammable than traditional lithium-ion batteries. Coupled with a good integrated BMS, the risk of using a LFP battery should be minimal.

    You say cost, but did you look at my life cycle breakdown analysis? If a LFP battery gets at least halfway to the manufacturer's life cycle rating, it becomes more cost effective than lead-acid. Also, the life cycle rating is based on how many cycles it takes to degrade to 80% capacity. A LFP battery is still usable in an ICE automotive application down to 50% or so.

    Leave a comment:


  • JimN
    replied
    Originally posted by jgraham37128 View Post
    I wonder when we'll migrate to lithium batteries?
    It's a long read, but this should be a consideration-

    https://www.nfpa.org/-/media/Files/N...ieshazard.ashx

    For cranking, they're not really necessary. For house batteries, they're barely necessary if the cost is factored into the application. If these boats had electric motors and were regularly recharged, it would be a different conversation.

    Leave a comment:


  • jgraham37128
    replied
    I wonder when we'll migrate to lithium batteries?

    Leave a comment:


  • JimN
    replied
    Different battery chemistries require different charging methods- deep cycle batteries can receive constant full charge level but flooded lead/acid can't if long life is a goal. The others (AGM, LiFePo4, LFP, Carbon foam, etc), have their own requirements and tolerances.

    https://www.pysystems.ca/resources/v...for-your-boat/

    https://carbonfoam.com/batteries/

    Leave a comment:


  • dfski
    replied
    If you're a member or know someone that is, my local Costco sells Interstate marine batteries.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcnst1
    replied
    Originally posted by Tsumi View Post
    I would make the suggestion of switching to lithium batteries, particularly if you plan on keeping the boat for a while. Look for LiFePO4 or LFP batteries. Sure, they're about 4-8 times the cost right now of an equivalent size lead acid battery, but they have 5-10 times the cycles, 3-5 times more power per cycle, and can be depleted to near zero without being damaged.

    Don't get any of the Amazon batteries. They're not designed for starting cars, and the relatively low peak discharge current ratings reflect that. Antigravity batteries are interesting but expensive; they have a feature that automatically shuts off the battery when a threshold is reached but reserves enough power to start an engine (not needed for non-starter batteries). ChargeEX is a bit cheaper than Antigravity for the same capacity but doesn't have the reserve feature. ChargeEX has a lifetime warranty against failure, but not wear of batteries, while Antigravity has a 10 year warranty.

    Battery on our boats are starting to show signs of lower capacity, which is why I have been looking into lithium alternatives. Most likely will be replacing them this winter or next winter.

    Thanks!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • jcnst1
    replied
    Originally posted by FoggyNogginz View Post
    There are several Interstate dealers near Raleigh. Check out the Dealer Locator on their website if you have not already.

    https://www.interstatebatteries.com/...97,-78.6381787

    Also, batteries are a dealer added item, and not a MasterCraft factory item. Choose whatever battery you wish as long as it meets the group size and CCA requirements. Lots of threads here on AGM versus flooded, but in my mind this comes down to how you use the boat, what electronics you have, and whether or not wanna spend serious money on a battery. I've used a lot of Interstate flooded batteries without issue. Current boat came with XSPower AGMs.

    Good luck.

    Thanks!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • Tsumi
    replied
    I would make the suggestion of switching to lithium batteries, particularly if you plan on keeping the boat for a while. Look for LiFePO4 or LFP batteries. Sure, they're about 4-8 times the cost right now of an equivalent size lead acid battery, but they have 5-10 times the cycles, 3-5 times more power per cycle, and can be depleted to near zero without being damaged.

    Don't get any of the Amazon batteries. They're not designed for starting cars, and the relatively low peak discharge current ratings reflect that. Antigravity batteries are interesting but expensive; they have a feature that automatically shuts off the battery when a threshold is reached but reserves enough power to start an engine (not needed for non-starter batteries). ChargeEX is a bit cheaper than Antigravity for the same capacity but doesn't have the reserve feature. ChargeEX has a lifetime warranty against failure, but not wear of batteries, while Antigravity has a 10 year warranty.

    Battery on our boats are starting to show signs of lower capacity, which is why I have been looking into lithium alternatives. Most likely will be replacing them this winter or next winter.

    Leave a comment:


  • FoggyNogginz
    replied
    There are several Interstate dealers near Raleigh. Check out the Dealer Locator on their website if you have not already.

    https://www.interstatebatteries.com/...97,-78.6381787

    Also, batteries are a dealer added item, and not a MasterCraft factory item. Choose whatever battery you wish as long as it meets the group size and CCA requirements. Lots of threads here on AGM versus flooded, but in my mind this comes down to how you use the boat, what electronics you have, and whether or not wanna spend serious money on a battery. I've used a lot of Interstate flooded batteries without issue. Current boat came with XSPower AGMs.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by FoggyNogginz; 10-24-2021, 04:11 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcnst1
    started a topic New Interstate Marine 24M-XHD batteries

    New Interstate Marine 24M-XHD batteries

    Both of my batteries have depleted beyond re-charging repair. It's time for replacements, but I'm having a difficult time finding them locally (I live in Raleigh, NC). Does anyone know the best way to order these as I'd prefer to stay with what came with the boat. I have a 2013 X-2.
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