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What Gas do you use?

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  • peytonvp
    replied
    [QUOTE=If you're struggling at -32 looking for that -35 pass finally, & running anything less than oxygenated race gas, it's your own fault people. [/QUOTE]

    Good stuff!

    Leave a comment:


  • sully
    replied
    Originally posted by carlsonwa View Post
    91 Octane (non-oxy) from my favorite station , Kwik Trip.

    same for all my small engine equipment.
    Same here but from Holiday.

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  • carlsonwa
    replied
    91 Octane (non-oxy) from my favorite station , Kwik Trip.

    same for all my small engine equipment.

    Leave a comment:


  • Huckelfin
    replied
    I LOVE octane threads. This one is the best though.

    https://forum.ballofspray.com/discus...ur-new-boat/p1

    If you're struggling at -32 looking for that -35 pass finally, & running anything less than oxygenated race gas, it's your own fault people.

    Leave a comment:


  • Footin
    replied
    87 Octane for me, if I am not going to use the tank in a couple days I add blue marine Sta-Bil.

    Leave a comment:


  • hunter991
    replied
    Originally posted by curver900 View Post
    This is what I do as well and in over 10 years I have never had an issue... I add a bit of sea foam to every fill up and to every can as well.. does it help? does it hurt? does it cost me more? the last yes, but I don't have any problems with carbs or injectors... knock on wood... so if it works it's what I do..

    I also drain the carbs on anything that sits for more than 3 months...

    YMMV....
    yep same here. Add seafoam and everything starts once the it's season begins. Never had an issue even with carbs using non-ethanol and seafoam.

    Leave a comment:


  • curver900
    replied
    Originally posted by hunter991 View Post
    91 Octane because its the only grade we can get without Ethanol. I never run ethanol gas in any of my toys, not boats, not sleds, not UTV's not even my lawn mowers.
    This is what I do as well and in over 10 years I have never had an issue... I add a bit of sea foam to every fill up and to every can as well.. does it help? does it hurt? does it cost me more? the last yes, but I don't have any problems with carbs or injectors... knock on wood... so if it works it's what I do..

    I also drain the carbs on anything that sits for more than 3 months...

    YMMV....

    Leave a comment:


  • hunter991
    replied
    91 Octane because its the only grade we can get without Ethanol. I never run ethanol gas in any of my toys, not boats, not sleds, not UTV's not even my lawn mowers.

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  • jewbacca
    replied
    Octane rating.

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  • MLA
    replied
    Storage can degrade octane.
    Are you referring to the actual octane molecule or the (R+M)/2 pump octane rating?

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  • jewbacca
    replied
    Octane is sort of my specialty by profession. I did a write-up on the F150 forum to try to help educate on what octane is/isn't as there is a lot of confusion and misinformation out there.

    https://www.f150forum.com/f2/end-all...thread-510819/

    I've heard marine engines have higher octane recommendations than needed because the manufacturers assume less turnover in the gas tank. Storage can degrade octane. The Indmar 5.7L has pretty much the same compression ratio as the Ford 5.4L (9.x:1) which uses 87, so it makes sense to me. If you are refilling the tank every couple of weeks during the summer you can probably get away with using a lower octane. But I would be very careful about using lower octane rating than recommended. Modern engines can retard timing if knock occurs, but it's a fail safe that you don't want to rely on. Plus it costs HP to retard timing. In any case, the final fill-up before winterization should absolutely use the recommended octane rating. There's never a need to use higher octane than recommended.

    At altitude, a naturally aspirated engine can use lower octane and be just fine. I'm at 4500' and use 87 instead of the recommended 89. Turbocharged engines compensate for lower atmospheric pressure and should use the recommended octane regardless of altitude.

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  • mikeg205
    replied
    Costco premium... upto 10% ethanol, my engine calls for 89.. no 87 and 91 at costco.. hard to come by non ethanol gas by me and the cost differential at the nearest marinas and getting there a PIA and not worth it imo. The engines in our tugs produce most torque at low rpms so why not use what the engine manufacturer recommends.. talking oil is much more fun [emoji16][emoji12]

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • 1redTA
    replied
    fuel with ethanol can cause issues with seals, metals and rubber lines if you own an older (pre 90s) engine switching to a non ethanol fuel will help from the issues mentioned above. For instance I didn’t run all the ethanol fuel out of my carb on the 81 and when I went to check things to start after winter the carb was infested with a white-ish covering over any part that still had fuel

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  • JimN
    replied
    Originally posted by peytonvp View Post
    That has always been my thoughts behind using the right octane. I know that modern fuel injection systems can retard timing so it is not as much of an issue but I know it is always better to be safe than sorry. The funny thing is my friend has 4 2007 Seadoo RXT, which are the supercharged skis, and he has run regular 87 octane since day one and he has over 300 hours on each ski. Skis call for premium but I would say he has had pretty good luck. That said I am not as brave and always run premium in my turbo skis.
    Well, that's the thing- if an injected engine knocks, the ECM pulls back the timing to whatever extent is needed and that limits performance.

    There's a whole lot of small engines that are injected, too- lawn mowers, snowblowers (we can explain those to you guys who never see snow, if you want), tractors, etc. I see that as a good thing, though- I have had to explain the easy way to start small engines to some of my neighbors who just about wore their arms out trying to get the things going. My next door neighbor broker wrist and her mower and snowblower both have electric start and even those didn't start reliably after sitting and when I showed her how to build compression and get some gas into the cylinder, they started on the first pull. The place that services them never told her about that.

    Leave a comment:


  • MLA
    replied
    I highly suggest that ethanol and octane be two separate discussions. The presents of or absence of ethanol have nothing to do with engine knock. Knock, or preventing pre-ignition, is all about the use of the proper octane, with or without ethanol. You need to first use the required octane or higher, then make the decision of seeking out E-free in the suggested octane or higher.

    If you can get E-free in the correct or higher octane, thats great, run it! But I would not run E-free in a lower then required octane. The chances of engine damage are greater with the low octane then from the ethanol.

    Leave a comment:

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