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trying to learn deep water slalom

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  • trying to learn deep water slalom

    I just started to pick waterskiing back up at the age of 67. I skied a few summers when I was a teenager. This is my third summer on the water and I'm consistent getting up with 2 skis and skiing 20-30 minutes at a time.

    I have tried and tried to get up on one. The first few times ended up faceplant. Now I actually get up and the ski swerves side to side for a few seconds and then dumps me one side or the other.

    It's been suggested to me to buy a slalom ski. But searching for beginner slalom ski results in a lot of very expensive skis.

    My skis are Connelly Eclipse 67". I'm 5'8" and weigh 170#.

    Any advice is much appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Bill Montgomery

  • #2
    Here we go... best to visit a slalom skier... to coach you!

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    sigpic...A bad day water skiing still beats a good day at work...1995 Pro Star 205....

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    • #3
      I would ask the driver to pull you up slower. If you can get standing and then start to swerve, a slower pull should help.

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      • #4
        The above is right, better to be shown and coached then reading blips on the interwebs.

        That said, what I always tell people learning behind me is: initially, favor pressure on your back foot to keep your ski straight, knees bent comfortably (not to your chest, but not straight), arms bent (use your biceps not your arms as a whole), resist the boat, but don't fight the boat.... just don't let it pull you over forward. The moment you feel that "hard pressure" like you're just plowing, or about to be pulled over forward, transition some resistance from your back foot to your front foot while continuing to resist the boat with your arms. The front foot pressure will help you plane faster, and you no longer need as heavy a back foot to keep you squared up.

        Don't pull your arms to your chest or let them all the way out at any point... use them like a [tight] "spring" to balance the force you need.

        But again... this is easier said in person as you watch someone and can help diagnose what particular part you're missing.

        Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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        • #5
          Start with a boom! No rope then a short rope off the boom, then long line.
          1991 Prostar 190
          2018 SeaDoo RXP-X300
          Lake James, NC

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          • #6
            Agree it's pretty tough to diagnose,

            1. the connely eclipse looks to be wide enough for a beginner. Ski should be fine. If anything even a longer/wider ski will make it easier.
            2. Face Plant, ski swerving, means to me, you are bending at the waist forward. Back should be straight, knees bent, as others have said keep arms bent(this allow you to adjust .
            3. Getting up, push ski high out of the water, arms bent, have the driver pull up slower(Do NOT hammer throttle), Ski Slower 25mph

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            • #7
              Mystic brings up a good point... square up your back and engage your chest muscles. Your waste and upper body should essentially remain in line with your legs. If you're bending at the waste, you lose the ability to use your arms (and chest muscles) to keep you upright and aligned, and takes away all of your ability to "give and take" a tad bit of the pull by adjusting your arms.

              Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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              • #8
                Get Small. Flexibility is important. The smaller you are, legs bent close to chest; the less resistance you will create through the water. Also watch the pros-The ski is always tilted to the side as the boat begins the pull. Much less side to side “tipsy-ness” if you allow the ski to rest a bit to the side as you begin.

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                • #9
                  Can you post a video of your attemps?

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                  • #10
                    If you have a tower, use that as your tow point. Much easier to be pulled up than “across”.

                    Get an “easy up” handle that has a sling to keep the ski tip straight.

                    Keep at it! You are my hero!


                    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                    • #11
                      Thanks so much everybody. Very good info. I'm going to keep at it. One of my problems is I give up too easy. After a couple of falls, I tell them to give me the other ski cuz I know I'm gonna get up on two

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                      • #12
                        Great advice here Bill! Keep at it and good luck. Hopefully I'm still skiing into my late 60s

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MasterCraft Ranger View Post
                          If you have a tower, use that as your tow point. Much easier to be pulled up than “across”.

                          Get an “easy up” handle that has a sling to keep the ski tip straight.

                          Keep at it! You are my hero!


                          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                          Here’s the handle I was referring to. I realize you may think you’re already “getting up” but these trainee handles have a sling to keep the ski straight.


                          https://waterskis.com/ho-skis-elite-...BoC3uIQAvD_BwE


                          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                          • #14
                            Ok, you guys, here's today's report. 6 slalom starts and only 2 came close to 'getting up'. I was fixated on front foot vs back foot and didn't pay any attention to whether my back was straight. I pushed a lot of water.

                            Skied with both skis for 20 min or so, then decided to drop one ski. Boat driver went into a cove and got me relatively close to shore. lifted the ski a bit. Previous attempts at this resulted in one end or the other of the lifted ski hitting the water and throwing me. Slipped my foot out of the lifted ski. I kept the off leg bent 90 deg at the knee for a little while till I seemed stable. Then gingerly put my foot into the RTP. Skied slalom for maybe 4-5 min. Voluntarily went down because I was concerned about my dropped ski for safety reasons.

                            At least I got a tasted for the slalom experience.

                            I did order one of the deep-V handles...we'll see how that works in a week or so.

                            Thanks everybody, you've all been very helpful.

                            Bill

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by boscoman View Post
                              Ok, you guys, here's today's report. 6 slalom starts and only 2 came close to 'getting up'. I was fixated on front foot vs back foot and didn't pay any attention to whether my back was straight. I pushed a lot of water.

                              Skied with both skis for 20 min or so, then decided to drop one ski. Boat driver went into a cove and got me relatively close to shore. lifted the ski a bit. Previous attempts at this resulted in one end or the other of the lifted ski hitting the water and throwing me. Slipped my foot out of the lifted ski. I kept the off leg bent 90 deg at the knee for a little while till I seemed stable. Then gingerly put my foot into the RTP. Skied slalom for maybe 4-5 min. Voluntarily went down because I was concerned about my dropped ski for safety reasons.

                              At least I got a tasted for the slalom experience.

                              I did order one of the deep-V handles...we'll see how that works in a week or so.

                              Thanks everybody, you've all been very helpful.

                              Bill
                              I grew up by "dragging' my rear leg then putting foot in rtp once I was up. When I switched to double boots, I had to seriously adjust my form when getting out of the water. Needed to be conscious to put enough weight on my back foot or I was getting pulled over the front.
                              Prior boats - (3) X14's, (3) Prostars, and a Tristar.

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