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  • I have power washed platforms in the past and it has worked well, make sure not to get too close or use too much pressure. I would wait for a couple of days after that for it to really dry out before applying any oils.
    OH-IO!

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    • Originally posted by Footin View Post
      I have power washed platforms in the past and it has worked well, make sure not to get too close or use too much pressure. I would wait for a couple of days after that for it to really dry out before applying any oils.
      Exactly. Don't concentrate on one area too long. It will get rough there. I only power washed the first time to get rid of the grit and grey. Did the lightener though, and then the oil. I have always used the Star-Brite with great success and I only do it once a year (season). I think the next time I will give you guy's formula a shot though. That sure looks nice and probably isn't as costly.

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      • One of the guys here (read I'm too lazy too look back) said that raw, not boiled linseed oil is the way to go to keep from getting dark. You can't just pick it up at Menards or Home Depot but it's easily available on Amazon. I'm going to switch to the raw version for this year.


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        • Originally posted by thatsmrmastercraft View Post
          One of the guys here (read I'm too lazy too look back) said that raw, not boiled linseed oil is the way to go to keep from getting dark. You can't just pick it up at Menards or Home Depot but it's easily available on Amazon. I'm going to switch to the raw version for this year.
          I saw this as well. I am planning to oil my platform this week, and I ordered some Raw Teak oil, however, I just found this comparison of Raw and Boiled Linseed Oil from Jamestown Distributors. I don't know that I want to wait "weeks" for the raw to cure! My hunch is that most have been using boiled and not raw linseed oil.

          "Raw" linseed oil is just that - linseed oil mercilessly squeezed from flax seed and packaged with no additional additives or preservatives. Raw linseed oil dries very slowly, taking weeks to fully cure. You should limit its use to the insides of wood gutters, chopping blocks, sawhorses, and other items exposed to the elements where drying time is not an important consideration.

          Slow drying is a mixed blessing. For oil-based paints and varnishes, slow drying is a benefit, since this allows the paint to "level" itself, giving a smoother finish with fewer brush marks. The best looking paint jobs are invariably oil paint jobs, without question. However, when used as a wood preservative for items that are handled or walked on, such as tool handles, furniture, or wood decks, long drying times are undesirable. 100% Pure, this slow drying oil has multiple uses. It helps wood retain its natural moisture, aids in water repellency, retards cracking, checking and shrinking.

          "Boiled" linseed oil, though, is not boiled. The actual boiling of some varnish oils changes their drying characteristics. With linseed oil, though, it is the addition of certain solvents that causes linseed oil to dry more quickly, acting as if it were boiled. This makes it a better product for preserving tool handles, decks, and furniture. I suppose they should have named it "sort-of-boiled linseed oil", or "kinda-like-boiled-but-not-really-boiled linseed oil". Boiled Linseed Oil is used as a natural wood finish and preservative, either alone or with other oils and solvents. Mixed with oil based paints and varnishes, it increases gloss and improves leveling and durability. A mixture of 2 parts boiled linseed oil to one part turpentine creates a semi-gloss wood polish for furniture. Can also be mixed with mineral spirits.
          Last edited by CruisinGA; 03-28-2016, 11:05 AM.
          Bailey
          '02 X-9
          Lake Blue Ridge

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          • Is there a standard wait time before the platform can get wet after having teak oil put on it? I let mine sit for nearly 20 hrs and I still had oil everywhere when I put the boat in the water. It looks as if I lost some of the oil from the platform.

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            • Originally posted by Mastercraftdave View Post
              Is there a standard wait time before the platform can get wet after having teak oil put on it? I let mine sit for nearly 20 hrs and I still had oil everywhere when I put the boat in the water. It looks as if I lost some of the oil from the platform.
              I use a heat lamp on mine after putting the Starbright on and in my mind it helps "set it". I haven't got a specific time line but would say a few days in the sun, or under a lamp?
              "One foot in the grave, one foot on the pedal, I was born a rebel" Petty

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              • I know some guys hate constantly oiling the deck but after a good oiling in the spring I let it bake in with the sun and then I keep a rag saturated with teak oil in a ziplock bag that I quickly wipe on the deck when it gets parked in the garage in the evening. It takes one minute to wipe it on and maybe another to take a dry rag and wipe it down 5 min later. This seems to keep my decks looking like new all the time.
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                "America is about speed. Hot, Nasty, bad-a$$ speed"
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                • I don't do it at the ramp so that I leave time for the water to dry on the way home and so that I don't get road dirt sticking to the fresh oil. I know some people would claim that I am not giving the wood enough time to dry but since I keep the deck so well oiled all the time I never really get water soaking into the wood with the exception of the cracks. When I do the above mentioned wipe down of the deck after skiing I don't dump the oil on to the point it would run in the cracks anyway, only a surface coating. I do the "deep" treatment a couple times a year and then I do make sure the wood is dry in all places.
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                  "America is about speed. Hot, Nasty, bad-a$$ speed"
                  -Eleanor Roosevelt

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                  • Bubba- you are using raw linseed oil, right?
                    After you oiled the platform the first time how long did you need to wait before it "cured"?
                    Bailey
                    '02 X-9
                    Lake Blue Ridge

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                    • Ready to rock and roll
                      Attached Files

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                      • First coat.
                        Attached Files

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                        • Wiped down after 30 Minutes.
                          Attached Files

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                          • Dried.
                            Attached Files

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                            • The 75%/25% mixture. Which is the 75%?

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                              • Originally posted by Snipe View Post
                                The 75%/25% mixture. Which is the 75%?
                                Linseed oil

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