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  • #46
    Originally posted by sticknrudder View Post
    Once I removed the key it slid out just beautifully.
    Bingo.

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    93 190
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    John 14:6
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    • #47
      I am sorry to say I’m not proud of these pictures…I’m afraid I made a pretty big mistake in sawing the old bushings out. I found it harder than expected using the sawzall under there. Dan Tanis’ video made it look much easier. When I was cutting out the front bushing, I didn’t realize the saw blade was contacting the aft side of the strut where the other bushing used to be. I scored up the top of the barrel as seen in the photo pretty bad, as much as an inch into the barrel. Do you think I just made it to where the new bushing won’t stay in place?

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      • #48
        Originally posted by sticknrudder View Post
        Do you think I just made it to where the new bushing won’t stay in place?
        No, but not sure if this warrants a strut replacement. It appears the integrity of the part is still in tact.

        Do these have to be cut out? They can't be tapped from opposite side? I don't know because I replaced my strut when I this all apart.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by sticknrudder View Post
          I am sorry to say I’m not proud of these pictures…I’m afraid I made a pretty big mistake in sawing the old bushings out. I found it harder than expected using the sawzall under there. Dan Tanis’ video made it look much easier. When I was cutting out the front bushing, I didn’t realize the saw blade was contacting the aft side of the strut where the other bushing used to be. I scored up the top of the barrel as seen in the photo pretty bad, as much as an inch into the barrel. Do you think I just made it to where the new bushing won’t stay in place?
          All good. I have seen worse. This is where the drift punch comes in handy, as I mentioned earlier but to your comment, the saw is not the most graceful tool in the tool box.

          If you have the new vesconite bearings, put them in the freezer overnight. They will go in just fine.

          I use a 1/2" diameter threaded rod, washer, and nut to compress the bearings into the strut barrel. The strut looks OK. Don't sweat it.

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          93 190
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          John 14:6
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          • #50
            Originally posted by RxMC View Post

            No, but not sure if this warrants a strut replacement. It appears the integrity of the part is still in tact.

            Do these have to be cut out? They can't be tapped from opposite side? I don't know because I replaced my strut when I this all apart.
            A fellow thinks one can punch them out but it just doesn't move like that. I wish it did. I make the cut as shown above, then use a 3/8" diameter (tip) x 12" drift punch to knock them out. Gouging the strut a little with the reciprocating saw is more of a casualty of the fix than a slight of error.

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            Last edited by waterlogged882; 01-24-2023, 08:36 PM.
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            • #51
              Very glad to hear it looks ok. I did use a 9” long 3/16” drift pin but I thought I had to cut them all the way through first. I went with the original rubber/brass type. I have them in the freezer now. I’m planning on putting them in tomorrow.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by sticknrudder View Post
                Very glad to hear it looks ok. I did use a 9” long 3/16” drift pin but I thought I had to cut them all the way through first. I went with the original rubber/brass type. I have them in the freezer now. I’m planning on putting them in tomorrow.
                Keep wrenching. You are on the right track.

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                • #53
                  Got them installed. Installation went surprisingly well. I had a hard time finding a bolt long enough so I ended up with a bolt hook from a local farm store. Worked great. Propshaft is nice and tight in the strut now, with no movement or noise.

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                  • #54
                    Now my attention has shifted back to the alignment issue. I found that trying to move the prop shaft from the propeller end results in no movement. Nice and tight. While on the coupler end, there is movement. It naturally wants to sit lower in the shaft log. When I lift up on it up a little it is nice and centered. I added a link to a video that shows what I am talking about.



                    If I lift up the shaft a little it centers it in the log and it lines up well with the transmission flange. But with it low in the shaft log, it is below the height of an arguably too-low engine. Is it acceptable to lift up on the end of the shaft some? Seems like a saw a video, maybe Dan Tanis where he put a piece of hose between the log and the shaft to hold it in place for alignment.

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                    • #55
                      Here's the video I was referencing. Before he puts the piece of water hose in, the shaft appears to be resting on the bottom of the shaft log.

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                      • #56
                        Here's what I know, tried and proven in my shop.

                        You are asking the right questions. When you are close with the hose, the shaft will slide right into the male/female coupling receptical. Your concern is legitimate.

                        The hose is one method as well as Popsicle sticks taped to the shaft, etc. As long as you get the shaft in the general center area with a little movement from the flexibility...all good. I have even aligned with the shaft off-center but not binding so perfect center is not required.

                        What you want to be aware is not force anything to the point of putting it in a bind. There is room for movement within the shaft log taking into consideration of where the engine is. Remember at the point of "final answer", you will move the engine to the shaft, not the shaft to the engine.

                        With that said, and you may have to pull the shaft a little (which is OK).

                        When sliding the couplings together fairly nicely (you'll know when you get there), the actual movement of up and down / left and right on the mount adjustments to get your desired 0.003-5" clearance, that will bring the shaft right where it needs to be, not bound by force, with proper clearance.

                        This is where the importance of having manageable engine mounts comes in to play. I have seen a lot of them seized beyond recovery.

                        I relate this step in the process as an art and no so much a science. You are on the right track. Remember, when the front goes down, the rear raises, etc. Take your time and think it through. Patience.
                        93 190
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                        • #57
                          That is really good news because I think that will allow me to align it without having to put the engine lower which can’t really be done. I’m hopeful now this will work without having to shim the strut or anything. Thanks!

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                          • #58
                            Do a dry fit before you seal the bolt holes, etc. At that point you'll find out about shimming (or not) and that is really no big deal. A shim merely redirects the strut to guide the shaft closer to the position of getting the shaft thru the log and mate to the transmission coupler (co-linear alignment).

                            Here is an example of how I set in an engine and align it from tip to tail (co-linear). I set and check with a laser level beam.

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                            93 190
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                            John 14:6
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                            • #59
                              That hose is a great idea. You don't want the shaft resting in the log, that was maybe part of your problem? Remember you are aligning the engine to the shaft. Very easy to think you can just move the shaft this way or that way and it will line up good but then you are defeating the purpose.

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by sticknrudder View Post
                                Another tool I had been waiting on was a prop puller off eBay. For $42 shipped its a nice puller and worked great.
                                do you have a link to the puller you got?

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