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Fuel Filter Change on 2005 X-2/MCX

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  • JimN
    replied
    Originally posted by Millertime View Post
    Thanks JimN. I will get a gauge. Can I test with boat on trailer, (5gallon pail and garden hose)? It would be quite a trip to get to water. When should I watch for a reading on the gauge? Key on, but not starting. Key turned and trying to start?
    If you listen carefully when the key is turned to ON, you should hear a few clicks. That's the System, Ignition, and Fuel Pump relays. Put your fingers on the Fuel pump relay and feel for a click when the key is turned on, then it should stop after three seconds. This is the priming sequence. If you feel nothing, insert a wire on the terminals marked 30 and 87a. If you still hear nothing, measure voltage at the pump's plug. If you see voltage and have a test light (the bulb-type, not the LED-type), make sure it lights up brightly. If not, the plug may have a problem (bad terminal(s)) or the pump is dead. Inspect the plug and receptacle for signs of melting plastic.

    It needs to be under load when testing fuel pressure, but if the pump is dead, that's a moot point.

    Make sure the check valve is replaced along with the pump.

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  • Millertime
    replied
    Thanks JimN. I will get a gauge. Can I test with boat on trailer, (5gallon pail and garden hose)? It would be quite a trip to get to water. When should I watch for a reading on the gauge? Key on, but not starting. Key turned and trying to start?

    Leave a comment:


  • JimN
    replied
    Originally posted by Millertime View Post
    Hoping for some help. Just this past Saturday we had our boat out (2008 X2 350MCX), and after about 30min of normal operation as I idled down the engine died. After that it would not fire. I let it sit for about 10min and it would fire for about 1sec then die again. We have about 235hours and I am assuming its the fuel pump? I called the dealer and wont be able to get it in till first week in October. So thinking of tackling this myself, I have been reading the threads for about 3 hours now and have a few questions before I go and buy a new fuel pump module.
    Can I test the fuel pump without a fuel pressure gauge?
    My boat is out of water now can I test the pump without starting the engine?
    Thanks in advance.
    You need a gauge and can't do a valid test without it. It also needs to be on the water, not on the trailer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Millertime
    replied
    Hoping for some help. Just this past Saturday we had our boat out (2008 X2 350MCX), and after about 30min of normal operation as I idled down the engine died. After that it would not fire. I let it sit for about 10min and it would fire for about 1sec then die again. We have about 235hours and I am assuming its the fuel pump? I called the dealer and wont be able to get it in till first week in October. So thinking of tackling this myself, I have been reading the threads for about 3 hours now and have a few questions before I go and buy a new fuel pump module.
    Can I test the fuel pump without a fuel pressure gauge?
    My boat is out of water now can I test the pump without starting the engine?
    Thanks in advance.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerseydave
    replied
    450 hours on the original fuel filter? That may be the reason for your shorter pump life?
    I was told the fuel filter should be changed every 2 years, or more often in areas with no layup time (florida) where the boat gets more use annually.

    Sorry to hear you jinxed yourself 3 months ago with that post.
    These fuel pumps just don't seem to be tough enough, but then again other boat builders are most likely having pump issues too.

    Leave a comment:


  • vision
    replied
    First, thanks again to Boofer and everyone who contributed to this thread. I was able to replace my fuel pump in about 60 minutes and get back out on the water.

    Second, I answered my original question as to whether the pump improved in 2008. The 2008 fuel pump still sucks and looked identical to the one in my 2005. I have never let my gas go below 1/3 of a tank but the pump died yesterday. Oh well, at least I made it to 500 hours.

    Leave a comment:


  • vision
    replied
    Originally posted by Jerseydave View Post

    Does anyone know if a new replacement module is better quality than they were back in 2005?
    I do not know. But, My 2005 went through 2 fuel pumps over 600 hours. My 2008 has 450 hours on original pump and filter. So I am hoping that maybe by 2008 the design improved? Probably fail on the next outing now that I posted this...

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerseydave
    replied
    2005 X-star MCX with approx 175 hours

    Last summer my boat ran great UNTIL I got down to 1/4 tank then it would die.

    Back to the dock to fill up, ran great again until 1/4 tank and died again.

    Remove the module, replaced the filter and ran great once again. I can fill the old filter with gas (holding it like a bowl) and the gas does not pass through the filter material. I believe the filter was my whole problem, so I would recommend changing it at least every 2 years.

    Did I overheat the pump and shorten its life? Maybe.....I might just change the pump this year to avoid future problems. 200+ hours on the OE pump is probably all I'm going to get out of it. And I hate getting towed in.

    Does anyone know if a new replacement module is better quality than they were back in 2005?

    Leave a comment:


  • JimN
    replied
    Originally posted by Thrall View Post
    Makes sense, but the filter isn't a water separator, so if one starts out with a clean tank and presumably filtered fuel from a decent filling station, the filter should last much longer than 100hrs I'd think.
    Not a water separator specifically, but when phase separation occurs, it doesn't flow much of anything very well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Thrall
    replied
    Originally posted by JimN View Post
    The difference between car/truck filters and boat filters is that a car or truck's tank is sealed and pressurized, unlike a boat tank that has a vent to the atmosphere. This introduces a lot of moisture to the tank and we've all seen stories from people who found that their gas was badly contaminated by water and phase separation. The reason the tanks aren't pressurized? Look at the Coast Guard for that.
    Makes sense, but the filter isn't a water separator, so if one starts out with a clean tank and presumably filtered fuel from a decent filling station, the filter should last much longer than 100hrs I'd think.

    Leave a comment:


  • JimN
    replied
    Originally posted by Thrall View Post
    A dealer I trust told me not to worry about the filter at 100hrs and basically not to change it at all as long as the fuel tank stays clean. Makes sense I suppose. Most of the automobile in-tank pump filter combos don't have a maint interval for the filter, and even if they did, 100hrs is nothing to put on a car engine. The average car at 100k miles has 2000-3000hrs on the engine. 20-30 fuel filters in 100k miles is waaaaay excessive unless you got a rusty old gas tank.
    The difference between car/truck filters and boat filters is that a car or truck's tank is sealed and pressurized, unlike a boat tank that has a vent to the atmosphere. This introduces a lot of moisture to the tank and we've all seen stories from people who found that their gas was badly contaminated by water and phase separation. The reason the tanks aren't pressurized? Look at the Coast Guard for that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Thrall
    replied
    Originally posted by vision View Post
    While recommended in the manual, you will find that a significant number of MC owners and MC mechanics do not actually change the fuel filter at the bottom of the fuel pump every year. As many have said, change it when the pump dies. Others argue the pump will last longer if you change it. Obviously, how clean your gas stays and how low you run your tank will influence filter and pump longevity.
    A dealer I trust told me not to worry about the filter at 100hrs and basically not to change it at all as long as the fuel tank stays clean. Makes sense I suppose. Most of the automobile in-tank pump filter combos don't have a maint interval for the filter, and even if they did, 100hrs is nothing to put on a car engine. The average car at 100k miles has 2000-3000hrs on the engine. 20-30 fuel filters in 100k miles is waaaaay excessive unless you got a rusty old gas tank.

    Leave a comment:


  • macattack
    replied
    Originally posted by 5280Hawk View Post
    So you have to go into the tank and pull that module every spring??

    What a Pain! I still haven't found where i can get the filter either. Does DIM have them?
    Yep, a pain, but it gets easier after the first time! I believe the only "filter" source is your local MC dealer; when you order the filter I would also suggest you get the rubber gasket that sits between the top of fuel module and fuel tank.

    Leave a comment:


  • vision
    replied
    Originally posted by 5280Hawk View Post
    So you have to go into the tank and pull that module every spring??

    What a Pain! I still haven't found where i can get the filter either. Does DIM have them?
    While recommended in the manual, you will find that a significant number of MC owners and MC mechanics do not actually change the fuel filter at the bottom of the fuel pump every year. As many have said, change it when the pump dies. Others argue the pump will last longer if you change it. Obviously, how clean your gas stays and how low you run your tank will influence filter and pump longevity.

    Leave a comment:


  • 5280Hawk
    replied
    So you have to go into the tank and pull that module every spring??

    What a Pain! I still haven't found where i can get the filter either. Does DIM have them?

    Leave a comment:

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