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'96 Prostar Engine Box (dog house) sound proofing/insulation

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  • '96 Prostar Engine Box (dog house) sound proofing/insulation

    Another refurbish project I took on this pre-season was the crumbling engine insulation in the engine cover. I had been avoiding replacing it, as I continued to try and glue the falling pieces into place for another band-aid.

    So what did I pick? Second Skin Audio, Damplifier Pro deadening mats. I picked this for 2 reasons - 1) made in the U.S.A. (sure, you can find cheaper imitation stuff out there, but I wanted to support a U.S. company, and I also felt very confident of the quality of the product), and 2) it's a thin, dense material that has great stick, and reduces the scraping against the tight components in the cover (no more trying to flex the cover around the hoses when closing the cover). And there's a 10% discount that pops up when you go on their website, by the way, so use that (it's a better price than Amazon, and shipping is free).

    The job wasn't bad - I calculated about 30 sq ft needed, so I ordered a bulk package, which was 36.67 sq ft (22 sheets) for a little over $220.00. I also purchased some black aluminum foil tape on Amazon, since the panels were black.

    While I was in there I replaced the gas shocks with Taylor Made TAY1853 stainless gas struts, 20" x 40lbs. I've read a few different opinions on the pressure, but I found 60lb is too much (it actually flexes the engine box and pulls in the cover so it hits the cooling hoses) and 30lb or less isn't enough (it might drop on your head or foot). 40lbs worked perfect for me!

    No one's lifting the cover and inspecting my job (except me), but it looks pretty good. I didn't feel the need to tape every seam, although you might want to. I taped where panels crossed, and at the tight bends. But overall, great product, not a bad install (get a small wall paper roller to really tap it down, and clean the surface really well before applying with GooGone or a good glue removal product.
    Here are a few before and after pictures of the job. Cheers
    Attached Files
    Jeffer
    TT Enthusiast
    Last edited by Jeffer; 10-05-2021, 10:28 PM. Reason: typo
    Jeffer

    1996 Prostar 190, LT1

    "5 out of 4 people have a problem with statistics..."

  • #2
    Hey Jeffer, Looks great!!

    I am looking to do the same thing and hoping you can tell me if there was any difference in noise? Did the sound deadener you used make any difference to the noise from the engine? Also did you look at any foam based liners for this?

    My foam is also shot and crumbling so I initially looked at a foam lining to replace like for like, but I see a few guys using the butyl style dampeners and now not sure?
    Cheers

    Mark

    '99 Mastercraft ProStar 205 330-LTR

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    • #3
      I honestly think the difference between the older foam and the Damplifier Pro is pretty close - with the Damplifier being very slightly less, I think. But I'm just going by ear. Net, it's quiet. The Damplifier is supposed to be best for rattle noise (metal-to-metal, or bumps) but I found it perfect for the engine. Nice low rumble, no yelling to talk over it. For me, it was more about the compact fit.
      Jeffer

      1996 Prostar 190, LT1

      "5 out of 4 people have a problem with statistics..."

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      • #4
        $220 for that stuff?

        Comment


        • #5
          I like the wired remote (or so it appears). I have one on the shelf waiting to be installed. Thanks for the photos.

          .
          93 190
          .

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          • #6
            It's an Alpine head and yep, that's a remote. It's only downside it that it has a nice air temp sensor on the back, and of course the back is sitting right in the engine bay. So I def don't use that reading.
            Jeffer

            1996 Prostar 190, LT1

            "5 out of 4 people have a problem with statistics..."

            Comment


            • #7
              I hated the wireless Alpine remotes. Had two on my X30 and they were never really worked that well. If I still had it I'd switch it all out for wired Fusion stuff.
              -Tim

              Making boomers great again!! Boomin'

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              • #8
                I have used, this company, for acoustic foam. Sheet foam is very cheap. 1/2" is easy to work with. (Use the open cell...i.e.- no backing)

                https://www.foambymail.com/SFF/speak...am-30-ppi.html

                1" plain foam, doesn't improve much, for the hassle.

                If you want to really dampen sound, add some acoustic foam, in strategic areas.

                https://www.foambymail.com/acoustica...-products.html
                sigpic Ayyyy!

                2004 Red/White/Black something or other.

                Formally, 1994 RED Mastercraft 205, Chevy 5.7 TBI.

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                • #9
                  That model Alpine remote that I have mounted in the engine box area is wired, not wireless, so it's solid (you can see the wire coiled up in one of the pictures - I had added quick connects to the wire for that exact reason). The system is an Alpine iDA-x100m (with an amp mounted in the bow and removable faceplate on the head), which (imo) was awesome, but now EOL. It had a USB connector for an old-school iPod, but I added a bluetooth adaptor and play my iPhone that way. So no need to replace it anytime soon. Works always, zero glitches (compared to other audio posts I've read about).
                  Jeffer

                  1996 Prostar 190, LT1

                  "5 out of 4 people have a problem with statistics..."

                  Comment

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