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Oil may not need to be changed every year....

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  • curver900
    replied
    Originally posted by chrislandy View Post

    If you have a dizzy, remove it and use a priming shaft on a battery drill, spins the pump and primes the system without turning anything but the oil pump
    I'm dizzy how did you know? but now I learned something!

    Leave a comment:


  • chrislandy
    replied
    Originally posted by 88 PS190 View Post
    Problem is lots of folks here will lose their distributor clock by a tooth and then that will be a whole thing.



    Kinda overkill. You could also literally make a length of air hose, adapt the thread to fit the engine oil pressure sender hose. use a small funnel to pour oil in there and then pump it with a bike pump to push it around.
    Maybe, but you only do it once!



    If you're truly worried about it, as a fit an forget option, then you could add an Accusump, saves the oil pressure and releases it when you turn the ignition on to pre-lube the engine and also stops any oil pressure loss from surge when turning sharply (given the way you can chuck a Prostar around I'm surprised it isn't more of an issue)

    Leave a comment:


  • 88 PS190
    replied
    Originally posted by chrislandy View Post
    If you have a dizzy, remove it and use a priming shaft on a battery drill, spins the pump and primes the system without turning anything but the oil pump
    Problem is lots of folks here will lose their distributor clock by a tooth and then that will be a whole thing.

    If you are obsessed the tool you want is;
    https://www.jegs.com/i/JEGS/555/2355...xoCEIIQAvD_BwE

    You fill the tank with oil, pressurize it with your air compressor or a hand pump and then thread it into your block into any oil chamber that has a threaded fitting - in practicality there is usually a bung near the oil filter or you pull the oil pressure sender and thread it in.


    Kinda overkill. You could also literally make a length of air hose, adapt the thread to fit the engine oil pressure sender hose. use a small funnel to pour oil in there and then pump it with a bike pump to push it around.

    Leave a comment:


  • curver900
    replied
    Originally posted by FoggyNogginz View Post
    McDonald's uses canola oil, and their food always cleans me out. Must be good stuff.
    but does it prime the mating surfaces before it starts up??? or is it a dry start??

    Leave a comment:


  • Bouyhead
    replied
    Originally posted by chrislandy View Post
    If you have a dizzy, remove it and use a priming shaft on a battery drill, spins the pump and primes the system without turning anything but the oil pump
    Also the best way to prime on a freshly rebuilt motor.

    Leave a comment:


  • Taco47001
    replied
    Well you're just spitting garbage because that's not the way we've always done it....... haha

    Great post and I like where your heads at. I use Blackstone as well and will continue to do so. They tell me quite often that my junk WalMart oil is doing just fine......

    Leave a comment:


  • chrislandy
    replied
    Originally posted by curver900 View Post
    starting it after a long siesta causes the most damage to any motor regardless of any oil discussion.. if you are truly concerned then you would pull the safety lanyard spin the motor to get oil up into the journals and then start it... i don't know how else you can get oil to the bearings etc... wait fill it up till you can't put in any more in.. then drain it.. then fill it up to spec then start it!!!

    I doubt it makes any difference - after 20 years mine runs just fine like my 2-20 year old motorcycles and even older cars and tractors...

    oil threads are the best!
    If you have a dizzy, remove it and use a priming shaft on a battery drill, spins the pump and primes the system without turning anything but the oil pump

    Leave a comment:


  • FoggyNogginz
    replied
    McDonald's uses canola oil, and their food always cleans me out. Must be good stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • curver900
    replied
    starting it after a long siesta causes the most damage to any motor regardless of any oil discussion.. if you are truly concerned then you would pull the safety lanyard spin the motor to get oil up into the journals and then start it... i don't know how else you can get oil to the bearings etc... wait fill it up till you can't put in any more in.. then drain it.. then fill it up to spec then start it!!!

    I doubt it makes any difference - after 20 years mine runs just fine like my 2-20 year old motorcycles and even older cars and tractors...

    oil threads are the best!

    Leave a comment:


  • 88 PS190
    replied
    Originally posted by tommurtha View Post
    If acids are the issue... do most of you run the engine a bit after the oil & filter change? If not the old oil is still on the bearing surfaces
    Always..

    My actual winterization process is extremely streamlined, so as we reach the end of the season I usually switch off ethanol and to rec gas and try to run the ethanol low before switch over.

    Then on the day we're pulling it I try to ski in the AM and get the boat nice and warmed up, then I change the oil and filter on the lift, clean the boat out of all the skis, vests, gloves, towels and crap. Then I grab my bucket with the tools I use to drain the water and a few jugs of antifreeze and we boat up to the launch and pull it. Drop the water out of it at the launch, add the antifreeze, wipe it down and it goes straight to the barn.

    All told this is the fastest method for us because I don't have to haul the old and new oil out to the launch or do that at the storage barn I only need a couple of ratchets for the hose clamps and a bucket and antifreeze bottles and she's done at the lift. And it leaves all the summer boat stuff at the house too so less risk of loss/theft in storage.

    Leave a comment:


  • VTCharlie
    replied
    I change oil once per year no matter how many hours I put on unless I feel it needs it more often like when the kids ski 5 days in a row for many hours , then maybe even mid season too. I like knowing fresh oil is sitting in the engine over the long winter and ready to coat the engine at spring start up.Oil is cheap insurance for the expensive engine.

    Leave a comment:


  • curver900
    replied
    Originally posted by tommurtha View Post
    If acids are the issue... do most of you run the engine a bit after the oil & filter change? If not the old oil is still on the bearing surfaces

    I have always run engine to operating temp , drained the block quickly, then adding the pink antifreeze, then draining the old oil...

    Maybe I should change the oil before adding the pink. That would mean at least 10 minutes of running new oil


    Thoughts???
    it doesn't matter... but MCOCD says run it!

    Leave a comment:


  • ahhudgins
    replied
    The wife and I rebuilt two decks this summer, so the only time my boat got used was when family showed up, which was mostly on holidays. I bet I didn't put 5 hours on the boat all summer. I changed the oil this weekend and it was as clear as the day I put it in last November.

    This year was the first time in 33 years of marriage that I was hoping in-laws would show up on the weekend.

    Leave a comment:


  • jharmon203
    replied
    Originally posted by tommurtha View Post
    If acids are the issue... do most of you run the engine a bit after the oil & filter change? If not the old oil is still on the bearing surfaces

    I have always run engine to operating temp , drained the block quickly, then adding the pink antifreeze, then draining the old oil...

    Maybe I should change the oil before adding the pink. That would mean at least 10 minutes of running new oil


    Thoughts???
    This certainly makes sense to run the engine with the new oil to "coat" everything with anti-corrosion stuff if it's truly an issue. At the end of the day, I will have to admit the only thing these oil reports prove is that the oil is still good to be used. It doesn't mean that there isn't damage being done to the engine with the old oil. The only way the test could truly be determined to to tear down the engines after seasons and seasons of one method vs the other. I guess the oil analysis on the next season could be an indication of wear because, if there are more metals than typical then the oil potentially could be the issue if the boat isn't being used all that much.

    Because oil is one of the cheaper maintenance items on a boat, it makes complete sense to do it at the end of each year. However, don't pull your hair out if time doesn't allow for it. It's likely going to be ok.

    Leave a comment:


  • CantRepeat
    replied
    Get off my lawn, and go change your oil egg roll!

    No ones gonna wanna eat catfish fried in that stuff!

    Leave a comment:

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