Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What is this part?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What is this part?

    i know this is a bar of steel, but what purpose does it serve? is it needed?

    reason im asking is cause i dont see any other trailers with them on it.
    and it just seems to get in the way when trying to clip in the safety line and winch line.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    That keeps the tow vehicle driver from wearing the boat as a hat in the event that they brake hard or hit something, especially if they're towing it downhill. Don't leave it off or remove it. Nautique trailers had that for a long time, too. If I had a hard time getting the slot to fit over the bow eye, I would stand under the bow to the side, and move in so my back was in contact with the hull, then use my legs to lift the bow enough to slide the bar over the eye. Obviously, this only works if the boat is on the bow rest and in the correct position in the first place.

    Comment


    • #3
      It could be removed if you wanted to weld in a different style bow stop, but don't just remove it. It is indeed there for your safety.
      I spent most of my money on booze, broads and boats. The rest I wasted. - Elmore Leonard
      I had always thought that there was nothing quite so sad as an abandoned boat.-Terry Hayes

      Comment


      • #4
        It is a pain in the *** till you get the hang of it, that being same launch spot and repetition. Different lakes and launches offer different angles of approach and present different loading senarios. Here is what I do with our boat and it has worked great since I figured it out....

        Un loading:

        Get boat close enough to water on the ramp, then loosen the winch a bit so you can remove the bar. Lower the bar down and reconnect the winch strap (tighten to your desire) back boat in, start, release winch and say good bye.

        Loading:

        I back the trailer in just so the fenders are about 1-2" above water. I pull the boat into the trailer slowly and slightly turn the wheel to the left so when I give it gas it stays straight. My partner puts his palm of his hand under the tow bar with slight pressure and I power up until it pops in. Once in I kill the boat and the bar keeps it from moving anywhere, the winch strap is reconnected and left with about a foot of slack. I do this because the *** end of the boat is still floating and if you winch it down too tight when it settles it will pull the hell out of that strap/bar and bend it if you are not carefull. Slowly my partner pulls out just enough so I can set her *** straight on the bunks so the fenders dont rub on either side and then shes out. Tighten winch go home.

        JTR
        1983 MasterCraft Stars and Stripes
        Cream/Red Metal Flake
        "Powerslot"
        "The misery that is now upon us is but the passing of GREED-the bitterness of men who fear the way of human progress. The hate of all men will pass, and dictators die and the power they took from the people will return to the people and so long as men die Liberty will never perish."
        -Charles Chaplin-
        sigpic

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by 03geetee View Post
          It is a pain in the *** till you get the hang of it, that being same launch spot and repetition. Different lakes and launches offer different angles of approach and present different loading senarios. Here is what I do with our boat and it has worked great since I figured it out....

          Un loading:

          Get boat close enough to water on the ramp, then loosen the winch a bit so you can remove the bar. Lower the bar down and reconnect the winch strap (tighten to your desire) back boat in, start, release winch and say good bye.

          Loading:

          I back the trailer in just so the fenders are about 1-2" above water. I pull the boat into the trailer slowly and slightly turn the wheel to the left so when I give it gas it stays straight. My partner puts his palm of his hand under the tow bar with slight pressure and I power up until it pops in. Once in I kill the boat and the bar keeps it from moving anywhere, the winch strap is reconnected and left with about a foot of slack. I do this because the *** end of the boat is still floating and if you winch it down too tight when it settles it will pull the hell out of that strap/bar and bend it if you are not carefull. Slowly my partner pulls out just enough so I can set her *** straight on the bunks so the fenders dont rub on either side and then shes out. Tighten winch go home.

          JTR
          What he said, except I disconnect mine before I start to back down the ramp. My ramp is pretty steep and if you are on the incline it is next to impossible to release. The time or 2 I did forget to release it before backing down the ramp, I managed to release it with some forward throttle. Once the tension is off it, it will drop on its own. (but this takes more throttle than I like to give. The few time I did this I felt like I might end up in the bed of the truck.

          There are haters of this bar, but mine has served me well for the last 30 years.
          STARS AND STRIPES FOREVER

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by 03geetee View Post
            It is a pain in the *** till you get the hang of it, that being same launch spot and repetition. Different lakes and launches offer different angles of approach and present different loading senarios. Here is what I do with our boat and it has worked great since I figured it out....

            Un loading:

            Get boat close enough to water on the ramp, then loosen the winch a bit so you can remove the bar. Lower the bar down and reconnect the winch strap (tighten to your desire) back boat in, start, release winch and say good bye.

            Loading:

            I back the trailer in just so the fenders are about 1-2" above water. I pull the boat into the trailer slowly and slightly turn the wheel to the left so when I give it gas it stays straight. My partner puts his palm of his hand under the tow bar with slight pressure and I power up until it pops in. Once in I kill the boat and the bar keeps it from moving anywhere, the winch strap is reconnected and left with about a foot of slack. I do this because the *** end of the boat is still floating and if you winch it down too tight when it settles it will pull the hell out of that strap/bar and bend it if you are not carefull. Slowly my partner pulls out just enough so I can set her *** straight on the bunks so the fenders dont rub on either side and then shes out. Tighten winch go home.

            JTR
            so as your pulling the boat out doesnt it try to slid backwards with the slack in the winch?
            and do you tighten the winch after she is completely out of the water?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by mctristar View Post
              i know this is a bar of steel, but what purpose does it serve? is it needed?

              reason im asking is cause i dont see any other trailers with them on it.
              and it just seems to get in the way when trying to clip in the safety line and winch line.
              that particular part SAVED my brand new, hours old, boat when I rear ended a guy that pulled out in front of me. I never hit the brakes! Boat never moved!
              http://weathersticker.wunderground.c.../Brunswick.gif

              Comment


              • #8
                looks like ill prolly just deal with it lol

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by mctristar View Post
                  so as your pulling the boat out doesnt it try to slid backwards with the slack in the winch?
                  and do you tighten the winch after she is completely out of the water?
                  The bar is a good thing. Learn how to use it (launch and load) and you'll be in high cotton. It's very easy to utilize by one's self even when loading.

                  The boat will only slide back within the distance of the slot on the bar (less than an inch or so). as you load the boat, slip the bar onto the bow eye and clip the strap to the eye. Leave the winch strap loose until you get completely out of the water. Reason; while still in the water (depending on depth of trailer) your back end may still be floating. Don't cinch it down until the back end sets on the trailer (out of the water).

                  There are several threads here on TT about this bar. I'd not want to be without one.

                  The poster earlier in this thread told you everything you need to know about trailer depth, launching, loading, throttle forwards to drop the bar, etc....

                  .
                  Last edited by waterlogged882; 09-23-2012, 06:47 PM.
                  93 190
                  (safe click)
                  John 14:6
                  (safe click)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    i greatly appreciate all the replys.
                    im a noob so bare with me.

                    yes the info above helps a lot!!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      here you might want to read this it is an upgrade for the older trailers.
                      it has all the measurements you should need .
                      Mastercraft boat buddy retrofit. check the attatchment .
                      this may be another option for you . one day i will retrofit my trailer.

                      i too hate my bar but i would never go without it .PDF file below
                      this is for 1987-1989 trailers



                      ,,,,,,,,,,,,,PDF here
                      Attached Files
                      sigpic

                      1988 mastercraft tristar (open bow).

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I think the bar is an ingenious way to keep the boat on the trailer during a panic stop. Having said that, I removed the bar on my trailer, and am quite happy that I did. If you decide to keep the bar, good luck loading your boat next time you're alone.

                        If the bar was such a great idea, MC wouldn't have stopped providing them 20 years ago.

                        If there's concern about restraining the boat on the trailer it would be easy to replace the bar with a length of chain and a turnbuckle.
                        Last edited by Miss Rita; 09-27-2012, 05:00 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I load my boat alone everytime with that bar... not so bad once you figure it out.
                          -Mike

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I load my boat alone everytime with that bar... not so bad once you figure it out.
                            I went to college, and then some. I may not be smart, but I'm ejucated. I could never figure out how to keep one hand on the throttle, one hand on the wheel, and one hand on the trailering bar.

                            You're a better man than me.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Put the trailer deeper, float it on, with the wheel centered pull it out nice and slow. As far as this being changed for the better, keep in mind that they went to the boat buddy, which leaves marks on the glass and has been known to take chunks out of the glass according to some of the threads here. Sometimes the easiest answer isn't the best. For that matter I rarely need to do it alone, there are always three of us skiing anyway.
                              I spent most of my money on booze, broads and boats. The rest I wasted. - Elmore Leonard
                              I had always thought that there was nothing quite so sad as an abandoned boat.-Terry Hayes

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X