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Building Observer Seat for 205

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  • Building Observer Seat for 205

    Hi all, so I was unable to acquire a 205 seat and bench frame so I have to build my own. My upholster guy is coming Friday to do the tear out so I am cutting out the cushion bottom to give him and will have him upholster the same as the rear bench using 4” foam lip with 3” middle. Tonight I took out the old broken Prosport co captain chair and noticed the floor was raised and reinforced assuming for added strength.

    My question, can I grind/sand down a section of that off where I am framing my base so it is all flat on the floor? Is the fiberglass built up and thicker or is it raised? Any advice appreciated.


  • #2
    Originally posted by Colettijd View Post
    Hi all, so I was unable to acquire a 205 seat and bench frame so I have to build my own. My upholster guy is coming Friday to do the tear out so I am cutting out the cushion bottom to give him and will have him upholster the same as the rear bench using 4” foam lip with 3” middle. Tonight I took out the old broken Prosport co captain chair and noticed the floor was raised and reinforced assuming for added strength.

    My question, can I grind/sand down a section of that off where I am framing my base so it is all flat on the floor? Is the fiberglass built up and thicker or is it raised? Any advice appreciated.
    The floor itself is a piece of composite cloth and gel that is maybe 1/8" - 3/16" thick, laid in as a whole piece (upon OEM assembly) on top of the underfloor system (composite, foam-filled channel). I have not worked on what is shown in your photos but my best guess is that is an additional pedestal-type configuration if I am seeing the photo correctly. It could be a solid piece or a hollow shell pedestal. Nothing a front-blade oscillating saw will not take care of.

    To your question, yes you can sand or grind that area down to flush with the rest of the floor and not do any harm. I recommend a belt sander instead of a grinding wheel if/when you get to that (flush) point...much less dust with the sander. Your mileage may vary.

    While you are there, put in seat heating pads for the passenger bottom and back. Easy, inexpensive and no better time. Then peel the skins back on the driver's seat bottom and back and retro-fit that with heating pads. No need to de-skin the entire seat, just peel back enough to slide the heating pads in place and re-staple the skins. You'll need a pneumatic stapler for that. The mechanical hand-held stapler will not work.

    For me, I'd leave the OEM seat because it is easy to manage, maneuver, and get around in that area of the boat. I have walked around the stick-out corner of a 2-person (judge and timer before GPS) seat configuration for 42 years and I'd love to have that single bucket seat setup. Just sayin'.

    In theory, with GPS, a manual timer (stop watch) is no longer needed.

    Maybe these two photos will give you a little insight.
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    • #3
      Originally posted by waterlogged882 View Post

      The floor itself is a piece of composite cloth and gel that is maybe 1/8" - 3/16" thick, laid in as a whole piece (upon OEM assembly) on top of the underfloor system (composite, foam-filled channel). I have not worked on what is shown in your photos but my best guess is that is an additional pedestal-type configuration if I am seeing the photo correctly. It could be a solid piece or a hollow shell pedestal. Nothing a front-blade oscillating saw will not take care of.

      To your question, yes you can sand or grind that area down to flush with the rest of the floor and not do any harm. I recommend a belt sander instead of a grinding wheel if/when you get to that (flush) point...much less dust with the sander. Your mileage may vary.

      While you are there, put in seat heating pads for the passenger bottom and back. Easy, inexpensive and no better time. Then peel the skins back on the driver's seat bottom and back and retro-fit that with heating pads. No need to de-skin the entire seat, just peel back enough to slide the heating pads in place and re-staple the skins. You'll need a pneumatic stapler for that. The mechanical hand-held stapler will not work.

      For me, I'd leave the OEM seat because it is easy to manage, maneuver, and get around in that area of the boat. I have walked around the stick-out corner of a 2-person (judge and timer before GPS) seat configuration for 42 years and I'd love to have that single bucket seat setup. Just sayin'.

      In theory, with GPS, a manual timer (stop watch) is no longer needed.

      Maybe these two photos will give you a little insight.
      .


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      Click image for larger version Name:	Floor configuration01.jpg Views:	0 Size:	64.6 KB ID:	2697068
      Click image for larger version

Name:	driver seat base inside01.jpg
Views:	138
Size:	166.9 KB
ID:	2697070

      Thanks so much, this was really helpful and actually caused me to turn my car around today and be late for work so I could check something out. There is metal in that square piece. Potential a welded nut on the bottom or top of the plate and then encased in fiberglass but it is a full metal square plate. This makes me more hesitant to cut it out. I think instead my plan will be to design the frame so they extend all the way to the end of that corner. For some this would be a NO as it narrows that area but honestly that is what I deal with the single bucket seat. My last boat had the single bucket seat as well and the same boat offered the bench and I regretted not choosing it. To add the bracket and swivel pieces on the seat are busted and having the bench there will give me some needed storage room for life jackets and other things.

      The heating pads are a good idea I will buy some and get my guy to install but I need to research if there a 12V line on the port side. The seats and all the vinyl is completely shot.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by waterlogged882 View Post



        For me, I'd leave the OEM seat because it is easy to manage, maneuver, and get around in that area of the boat. I have walked around the stick-out corner of a 2-person (judge and timer before GPS) seat configuration for 42 years and I'd love to have that single bucket seat setup. Just sayin'.
        Exactly why I searched for a one-owner ProSport 205. A back injury made the bench seat uncomfortable for my wife, and we had a PS190 at the time. The ability to face forward or backwards is a nice feature, and there is ample room to walk by and move around. I use the locker for storage, have ND mini tower also to keep skis and boards up and secure. And have a small "jump seat" that fits in the walk-through when needed.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by d2jp View Post

          Exactly why I searched for a one-owner ProSport 205. A back injury made the bench seat uncomfortable for my wife, and we had a PS190 at the time. The ability to face forward or backwards is a nice feature, and there is ample room to walk by and move around. I use the locker for storage, have ND mini tower also to keep skis and boards up and secure. And have a small "jump seat" that fits in the walk-through when needed.
          Well shoot............I will admit you both have me thinking about reconsidering. It is not a cost thing. In fact it might be cheaper and less material to do a bench vs refinishing the vinyl on the chair. Yes there are some other modifications needed like to the side panel but that would just be some plywood refab and very little of my time. To be honest with you I believe the seat, side panel and sticker are the only thing that makes Prostar vs the Prosport

          Pros of changing to a bench like the Prostar
          1. A little more under bench storage
          2. Larger seat for the Miss and a young one to share when needed (scares me having her in the front at 4 years old)
          3. Aesthetically better and more of a plus and easier to move about without the high chair back.
          4. Swivel chair hardware is broken and I need to find.


          Pros of leaving it as the bucket vs bench.
          1. Comfort for single person
          2. Keeping authentic as a true Prosport (this is for me)


          Maybe I missed some.

          Question for both you guys. If the bucket is so sought after then why do you think MC discontinued making them after 1995? I had a Yamaha Jet boat for a long time and they did and still offer either.

          Comment


          • #6
            Not sure on the why question but I will say this... do what makes the wife happy. Happy wife...happy life. Get working on that seat.

            Here is how they did it in 1968.

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