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  • #16
    I think for $1500, I would definitely try and do a couple myself. If you mess up, you can always remove the new staples and try again or pay someone to do it.

    Having done a few skins in the past, I can appreciate the pain of an entire boat. My bench seatback was incredibly difficult to get the skin on because it's got so many angles and lines (plus my sewing job wasn't too good). I looked like a hyeina out in the back yard jumping around with the seat and skin. Didn't realize how dumb I looked until I saw my brother and his girlfriend at the window laughing.

    Removing the skins yourself would definitely make the price of installation cheaper. Easy to do, just time consuming. I used a knife for mine. I used a Stanely manual powered as well, but had wood backing on the seats as opposed to plastic/fiberglass.
    1990 Maristar 210, 351W Holley 4160, 1:1 Velvet Drive

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Kevin 89MC
      You'll want a pneumatic stapler for going into plastic/fiberglass. The hand powered ones work fine for wood, but useless for plastic/fiberglass. I tried re-attaching the carpet along the bottom of my engine cover with my hand held one, and it didn't even scratch the fiberglass. I haven't tried an electric one, but sounds like they might not do it either. A small compressor is all it would take, and it would have many other uses (filling tires, balls, etc.)

      I'm going to delve into re-skinning mine soon, and can't really afford to pay for it, so my mind's made up! I say save the money & gain a skill, if you have the time & desire. Of course mine's an '89, so I won't be too picky if it's not perfect.
      Good luck.
      Stanley manual worked fine for me and I've got the plastic seat bottom. I almost want to say that it was easier to stable into than wood.
      Previous: 1993 Prostar 205

      Red 1998 Ski Nautique, PCM GT40, 310 hp, , Acme 4 blade, Perfect Pass SG/Zbox.

      FAQ


      Be kind. Have fun.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by east tx skier
        Stanley manual worked fine for me and I've got the plastic seat bottom. I almost want to say that it was easier to stable into than wood.
        Now that I think about it, I did not try to staple into any plastic, just the fiberglass. Now you got me wondering if my observer's seat is plastic or wood. I'll know in a little bit. I may still have to buy a pneumatic stapler anyways! You can't have too many tools!
        1989 ProStar 190 with "Safe T Top", 351 Ford, GT 40 heads painted Ford Blue, Elec. Ign, 1:1, 970 hours, 4 blade prop, PP 6.5, removable platform brackets, custom color from factory, hot water shower, Boat Buddy & LED lights on trailer (boat is sold, but not forgotten!)
        Currently have a '99 Response LX, but kinda miss the MC!
        2010 D3 Z7, 2 @ 32 off, 34 mph so far

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        • #19
          What was the comment about sewing for? If you have the skins, you don't have to so anything, do you?

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          • #20
            rmbrinner, I think he said the skins he got were not sewn particularly well. That's how I took it anyway. I did not have that problem with the skins I've ordered.

            You're correct, they come presewn.
            Previous: 1993 Prostar 205

            Red 1998 Ski Nautique, PCM GT40, 310 hp, , Acme 4 blade, Perfect Pass SG/Zbox.

            FAQ


            Be kind. Have fun.

            Comment


            • #21
              I didn't buy skins. I repaired them myself. I only had a few places that were ripped, so I cut out the damaged parts and sewed in new pieces. Here's my before/after shots. Only did the dark gray that was ripped
              Attached Files
              1990 Maristar 210, 351W Holley 4160, 1:1 Velvet Drive

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              • #22
                Glad to hear that. There is no way I could have done it if there was any sewing involved. I haven't even seen the skins yet, as they are still in boxes at my local MC shop. I think I am going to give it a try. If I don't feel to confident about my ability after doing a couple cushions, then I can always take it to a local uhpolstery shop.

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                • #23
                  I can't see anyone justifying 1500$ for installing skins. i'd look for a new quote before committing

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                  • #24
                    Why isn't MC installing also? Assuming that they sent the skins for free.



                    Originally posted by rmbrinner
                    I just recently received new skins from Mastercraft due to pinking problems on the original skins of my 02 X-Star. I was quoted a price of $1500 to install them.

                    Has anyone attempted this task before? If so, any instructions and tips would be greatly appreciated, as I would really like to save the money and do it myself if possible.

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                    • #25
                      If you read above you would have seen that MC has already done more than enough. I am the third owner of this boat and it is not under warranty anymore. I think the free skins is a pretty good deal in itself. I wouldn't have even expected them to do that given the situation. Secondly, the dealer is the one that would have to install at their expense, and I didn't purchase the boat from my local MC shop as I bought it out of state from the 2nd owner.

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                      • #26
                        FWIW, I was quoted $1200 to replace all the skins on my boat- I own a '90 Ski Nautique (closed bow). *ducks*

                        This price includes all new foam as well as labor, but not the vinyl. My quote is from a very highly recommended shop. $1500 sounds a little high if it only includes the labor (no foam), as I have been told there can easily be $300-400 worth of quality foam in a boat like mine.

                        While I do most of the work on my boat myself, installing vinyl is not something I want to tackle on my own, considering the price of new skins if I make a mistake. Besides, Im sure a pro will make it look much better than I could.

                        My $.02

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                        • #27
                          For an open bow, $1,500, while a lot of money, sounds about on par with what I've seen for installation by a reputable shop. The bottom line is that it's tedious and time consuming work. They're charging you a lot because one of their employees will be sitting in your boat for the better part of a couple of days and will not be working on anything else. Some pieces require more experience to get it done just right. I'd save them for last. Start with a square (or relatively square seat bottom) and work your way up the difficulty scale from there.

                          You're right, by the time you're done with a couple, you'll know if you're up for the task. If you're patient, and you work from the center to the edges and keep pulling it tight, you can make it look as good as a pro.

                          I hate doing this kind of stuff only slightly less than I hate parting with money for something I'm capable of doing. In the end, with the seats I've done, I don't think they could've been done much better.
                          Previous: 1993 Prostar 205

                          Red 1998 Ski Nautique, PCM GT40, 310 hp, , Acme 4 blade, Perfect Pass SG/Zbox.

                          FAQ


                          Be kind. Have fun.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            lay the skins out in the sun will make the job go faster

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Tom023
                              I found this tool in my tool box and used it to pull the stables. I'm not really sure what it is but it works great for getting under them and pulling them up.
                              It's a tool used to take the panel off a car door.

                              If it ain't broke.......screw with it till it is!

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by east tx skier
                                Some pieces require more experience to get it done just right. I'd save them for last. Start with a square (or relatively square seat bottom) and work your way up the difficulty scale from there.
                                This is really good advice. Some of the more complex skins have "extra" backing material sewn on, kind of like flaps. Be sure to notice exactly how the old skins were attached, because these "flaps" need to be pulled tight and stapled down the same way. They are used to pull the skins tight into curved portions of the seats. Just look carefully as you remove the old ones and you should be fine.
                                2001 X30 LTR

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