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  #11  
Old 08-27-2019, 11:22 AM
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Slvr Bulit Slvr Bulit is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2014
Boat: 1998 Ski Centurion
Location: north east
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My boat is a 98 that was oxidized pretty bad. I used this and was really impressed.

3M Marine Restorer and Wax with my PC 7424 with a cutting pad, then I followed up with a polish and a with less aggressive foam pad then waxed it all.

https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/company-...3242388&rt=rud
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  #12  
Old 08-27-2019, 12:40 PM
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bturner2 bturner2 is offline
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Boat: 2016 200 Sport Nautique
Location: Brighton, MI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paintpollz View Post
I was going to call you out before you said you worked in a body shop!

I have the 7424 and the 3 step 3M kit and it's been a complete waste of money so far (and it's probably operator error). The 7424 does my car fine with the Amazon pads and 3 step, but it does next to nothing on the boat. Nothing but disappointing on the boat.

What pads are you using with the 7424? I'd love to not buy a rotary since I don't do a lot of polishing, but I'm damn close to giving it a shot.
I was trying to see if I could find pictures that would show the before and after. I did but the it's hard to see just like when you see a boat listed then get there and get that first look of what you're really getting. You might be able to see it if you blow it up in your browser.

The first picture is the results from the dealer that tried to make it least presentable. In this picture they've used a general compound and a rotary buffer to try and put a quick shine on it, which is exactly what they got. This is much better than when I first saw the boat but no where near what my MCOCD would come close to allowing.

The boat is a 2016 Sport Nautique with 400 hours. The PO owns 2 Nautiques and changes one out every year so he always has a new boat. This was their slalom boat, the other is a G23 for their surf boat.

The boat was definitely not babied but not completely trashed either. I worked the deal so I got a complete new interior from the factory, a bimini and since the PO doesn't buy trailers (the dealer drives 4 hours up and back to pick up and store the boats for them) I got a brand new trailer as well. Along with all this I got a week to find any other issues and the dealer would take care of them for me.

There were no major issues with the boat but you could tell they rafted it a lot and it had tons of small scratches on the rear hull sides from bumpers, so bad that the gel coat appeared flat in the gloss spectrum, almost as if it were intentionally finished that way. The back was sun faded with ski scratches and a couple chips that I'm still working on. In general the rear third of the boat looked like it had never seen a coat of wax (which is probably the case) and just like a typical un-kept black rental car or boat.

So everything you see here was done with the 3 step wet sanding and 3 step compounding, with the latter being buffed with the Porter Cable and foam pads. For compounding I use Yellow pads for step 1, Orange pads for step 2 and white pads for step 3. I also use White pads to apply wax and use a grey pad to remove the wax following that with a micro fiber cloth by hand to detail the wax removal.

If you're not getting results you're not doing something enough or correctly. That black rear corner in the before picture was one of my 2x2 sections. I had roughly 45 minutes to an hour into it with about 30 minutes of that in sanding. Before doing anything make sure the panel is completely free of dirt. Wash it thoroughly. If you can feel any embedded dirt in the glass stop and clay bar the panel to pull out the dirt (I had to do this on the entire rear of this boat). Not doing this will only transfer the dirt back onto the panel and will scratch up the panel as you grind it in during the blocking process.

Step one is with 1000 and a rubber block. This step is used to flatten out the panel. I'll cross block the entire panel using liberal water with a touch of dawn mixed in the water (it's important to keep the panel wet and occasional wash off the panel with the water/soap mix to pull contaminants away from your work area). The idea here is to get the panel flat so you don't see the indentations from the scratches. Cross block the panel then dry it off. With it dry you'll be able to see if there are any low spots where the scratches were. Repeat until the panel is absolutely flat.

The next two steps are to remove the scratches from the 1000. Thoroughly cross block the entire panel the same way you did the first step drying the panel from time to time to see if the work area is getting smoother and is uniform in it's appearance. These 2 steps should go much quicker as again at this point you should only be removing the scratches from the 1000.

By the time you've moved through 2000 sanding it shouldn't take a lot of compounding to polish out the scratches from the 2000. If it does you screwed up. I like to polish in a east west then north south pattern and in a section like this it'l take me about 5 seconds to go lock to lock in either pattern direction. Take your time applying moderate pressure. Just like the sanding the courser grit will take the greater amount of time. Wash/dry the panel between the steps and don't let your pads fall on the floor or get contaminated with dirt. If they do remove them from the line up as they'll just scratch up your panel.

By the time you get to step 3 it should look and feel new and almost like it's waxed as you've effectively finished up with a polish. I like to lay down a protective wax layer with something like a Collinite product then a couple days later hit with a shine wax like Maguire's Flagship.
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  #13  
Old 08-29-2019, 01:03 PM
skongolf skongolf is offline
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Boat: 2001 Mastercraft x-30, 330hp
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Thank you for all the suggestions! After reading some more I found an Article about removing oxidation in a 4 step process. This may be a really dumb question, but when doing step with heavy compounding and a rotary buffer how long do you usually buff a section? Until the compound is gone or do you go till there is a slight haze then wipe off? Like I said, a dumb question but just want to make sure. Also some have said to use a spray bottle of water and some say don't. Which is correct?
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  #14  
Old 08-29-2019, 08:20 PM
waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skongolf View Post
Thank you for all the suggestions! After reading some more I found an Article about removing oxidation in a 4 step process. This may be a really dumb question, but when doing step with heavy compounding and a rotary buffer how long do you usually buff a section? Until the compound is gone or do you go till there is a slight haze then wipe off? Like I said, a dumb question but just want to make sure. Also some have said to use a spray bottle of water and some say don't. Which is correct?
Get three lamb's wool pads and a random orbital. Rotate the pads as they gum up. Wash one (spin it dry with the buffer) and keep working. Buff until the paste dries and you can see color on the pad. Hard to say how much time. You'll get a feel for it.

Use water to dampen the pad before you put the paste on. "Slow" cuts better than a higher speed.

Don't waste a lot of time on the entire boat. Find out if the compound is going to work (often can be hard to tell) by doing a small area. If you're not getting clean gel, wet sanding is inevitable.

.

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Last edited by waterlogged882; 08-29-2019 at 08:58 PM.
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  #15  
Old 09-13-2019, 05:30 PM
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DuraStar DuraStar is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2019
Boat: 2001 X-Star, LTR 330hp
Location: West
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I used Shur holds buff magic. 2 step. Buff magic starts out more abrasive and then smooths out as your working the product. Then the pro- polish shines and seals. Worked really good on my dads 89
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  #16  
Old 09-13-2019, 07:06 PM
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bturner2 bturner2 is offline
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Boat: 2016 200 Sport Nautique
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I've used both before. Works good for a good result, not exceptional like sanding and buffing as outlined. If good is good enough this is a very acceptable solution.....
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  #17  
Old 09-14-2019, 07:28 AM
waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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The bottom line is this; if a rubbing compound can cut through the oxidation to clean gel, all the better. If not, the oxidation will re-appear sooner than later.

Wet sanding will get through the oxidation to clean gel. Keep it waxed and out of the sun as much as possible and the clean gel will shine for a long time.

I have worked on boats and found the gel oxidized through the gel layer. Too little too late. Others will come to life with effort.

Your mileage may vary.

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  #18  
Old 09-16-2019, 11:20 AM
88 PS190 88 PS190 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bturner2 View Post
One other thing to note is that I'm doing all this with foam pads and a Porter Cable 7424 random orbital buffer. I know a lot of guys will say you need to use a rotary buffer (which I also own and having worked in body shop know how to use) but that's absolutely not true. With the right pad set....
How do you like the 7424?

I have a Milwaukee 7/9" rotary but it is pretty heavy and overkill for spreading wax and light polishing work.

Do you ever wish it was smaller for doing detail work? Or is the size overall useful?
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  #19  
Old 09-16-2019, 03:45 PM
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bturner2 bturner2 is offline
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I love my Porter Cable and it's very seldom that I ever have to use a rotary. It's very light and you have the option to remove the pad and attach a 3.5" backing plate if you need to go smaller. They also have a soft brush head that Sodar on TT has done a complete write up on how to use this tool for vinyl interiors.

That said as you can see from the posts I've made in this thread I'm no stranger to blocking and I actually prefer blocking to using a course compound. For me I have more control wet sanding and less risk of cutting through an edge accidentally. Then again if you've ever blocked out a couple cars you know how much practice blocking you'll get doing just one. I've also found gel coat to be much more forgiving than paint which is a bonus when sanding.

A buddy of mine bought a Flex from Auto Geek that I've used and I will say it's smooth and quieter but I'm so used to my Porter Cable that I doubt I'd switch even if it went belly up tomorrow (which it's showing no indications of doing). Also I'm used to the 90 degree handle and the Flex makes you reach over the pad which just seems unnatural to me.
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  #20  
Old 09-17-2019, 12:03 AM
wilkiesc wilkiesc is offline
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Boat: 1991 Maristar
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In between wet sands which I try to avoid given age of my boat, I use "Mary Kate's on and off". Stuff is magic but also very abrasive to anything not fiberglass including trailer, rubber and skin. Give it a look
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