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Old 01-21-2019, 06:12 AM
Anewman9 Anewman9 is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2018
Boat: 1997 prostar 205
Location: Texas
Posts: 23
Boat Maintance '97 PS 205

What's up everyone,

I'm looking to put in some off season work to the powertrain of the PS 205. I'm new to the boating scene but obviously I'm going to look at the impeller, spark plugs, oil and what not. However, I wanted to gather if there are other areas I should give special attention to that I may be missing.

Thanks again for the help!
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  #2  
Old 01-21-2019, 06:52 AM
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Snipe Snipe is offline
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Boat: 1998 ProStar 190
Location: Three Lakes,WI/summer;Menomonee Falls,WI/winter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anewman9 View Post
What's up everyone,

I'm looking to put in some off season work to the powertrain of the PS 205. I'm new to the boating scene but obviously I'm going to look at the impeller, spark plugs, oil and what not. However, I wanted to gather if there are other areas I should give special attention to that I may be missing.

Thanks again for the help!
Clean, clean, clean, stem to stern. the things you mentioned are annual chores (to get you hyped up)
Be sure to treat the vinyl so it doesn't harden up and start cracking especially st the seams. Search some of the maintenance posts here as to products available. There are tons of 'em.
Welcome to the TT family...
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  #3  
Old 01-21-2019, 09:40 AM
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mikeg205 mikeg205 is offline
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Boat: 1995 Pro Star 205 5.7 Liter
Location: Plainfield - Joliet, IL
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New cap, rotor, check battery cables for corrosion, new belt, lube steering cable and rudde box, check tstat.. lots to do on a 22 year old boat.

Have some pics of boat and motor?

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  #4  
Old 01-21-2019, 11:11 AM
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dmbeck dmbeck is offline
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Boat: 1998 Prostar 205 (Sold), 2006 x15 w/ mcx
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I'm a fan of draining and replacing the trans fluid if that hasn't been done, in addition to what others have suggested.
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  #5  
Old 01-21-2019, 03:40 PM
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93Prostar190 93Prostar190 is offline
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Boat: 2008 Prostar 214, MCX, Mini-Tower
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Prop shaft log, although that needs to be adjusted in the water usually ..... check for wear on the strut bearings.

Lube and check steering and throttle cables, should be smooth with no binding ...

Trailer .... brake fluid service, bearings.




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2008 Prostar 214 MCX
1995 Prostar 190 "Evil Minion"
Previous 93 Prostar 190 1.5:1 GT40

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  #6  
Old 01-21-2019, 09:08 PM
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Weekendpass Weekendpass is offline
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Boat: 2012 Mastercraft X-30
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A quick check of the transmission cooler is always a good idea. Any debris in the water gets sucked up and clogs on the screen inside the trans cooler. If completely clogged you will starve your engine of cooling water.
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  #7  
Old 01-22-2019, 12:37 AM
FrankSchwab FrankSchwab is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2004
Boat: 1998 Maristar 200VRS
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 2,014
I'm assuming the boat is new to you, and perhaps you don't have a good idea of how well the previous owner (the PO) kept up with the maintenance. In that case, I would assume none has been done, and do everything:
1. Engine: Change oil and filter. Change plugs, plug wires, distributor cap. Change fuel filter(s). Clean the air cleaner (spray it down with Brake Cleaner). Check all the hoses - if they don't feel new, replace them all (and the thermostat at the same time).
2. Transmission. Change fluid. Check the shaft coupler alignment as shown in the manual (Note: see section below about "Align engine to strut").
3. Check the battery terminals, and take the battery down to get it checked. It sucks to get to the lake and have a dead battery.
4. Grease the rudder, steering cable, and whatever else needs it.
5. Clean the boat, bow to stern. Pull everything out of all the storage, vacuum and clean. When you put stuff back, make sure you have everything you need:
- Whatever safety gear required by law in your jurisdiction (signalling devices, etc).
- Make sure you've got the necessary plugs (mine has a stern plug and a midships plug). Bring an extra of each.
- Ski gear - two flags (it sucks dropping one overboard), two ropes with handles, etc.
- Whatever tools you feel you might need and be able to use - at least a 6-in-1 screwdriver and pair of vise grips. My tool box on board weighs about 20 pounds, but I'm used to wrenching on things.
- Stash a spare pair of sunglasses and sunscreen in the glovebox - someone will forget theirs. Steal a plastic sandwich-sized Tupperware dish and lid for the glovebox - and make sure everyone on board puts their valuables in it (my wife put her engagement ring in the breast pocket of the shirt she was wearing - leaned over the rail to pick a ski out of the water, and it's now in 200 feet of water).
6. Trailer - pull the bearings, inspect and repack them. Check the age of the tires - if they're more than 5 years old, replace them. Inspect the brake fluid - if it's not clear, flush the whole system. If it's rusty, plan on replacing everything. Adjust the brakes if you have drums, inspect if you have disks. Make sure that when you hook up the trailer to your truck all the lights work. Make sure that, on level ground, the trailer is more-or-less level - if it isn't, change the ball height on your truck.
7. From outside the boat, inspect the strut and shaft log:
- kneel about 10 feet behind the boat, and look at the prop strut. It should be straight. If it isn't, you'll probably eventually want to replace it.
- Climb under the boat, and inspect where the prop shaft enters the boat through the shaft log. The shaft must NOT touch the shaft log - if it does, it'll eventually wear through the log. It doesn't have to be centered in the log, it just needs to not touch.
8. Align engine to strut. This is a job that needs to be done once in the lifetime of the boat and should be done at the factory, but often isn't done well. To determine if you need to do this, grab the prop and try to turn it with one hand. If you can do it with two fingers, you're in great shape. If it takes four fingers but only light effort, you're fine. If it takes two hands and a grunt, you really should do this.
In the world of inboard ski boats, the strut is the center of the world - everything gets aligned to it. It's non-adjustable, so when the propshaft goes through it and into the boat the transmission/engine need to move to meet it correctly. If the alignment isn't correct, the shaft will be flexing with each turn of the prop. Note that this alignment is different than the shaft coupling alignment specified in the owners manual - if you're going to do this one, you'll do the shaft coupling alignment as the second part of it. The attached document that's been floating around forever does a good job of walking you through it.

Feel free to ask any questions you have, there are lots of friendly and knowledgeable people here.
Attached Files
File Type: doc PROPSHAFT_ALIGNMENT-15676.doc (31.0 KB, 23 views)
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  #8  
Old 01-22-2019, 03:24 PM
Anewman9 Anewman9 is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2018
Boat: 1997 prostar 205
Location: Texas
Posts: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankSchwab View Post
I'm assuming the boat is new to you, and perhaps you don't have a good idea of how well the previous owner (the PO) kept up with the maintenance. In that case, I would assume none has been done, and do everything:
1. Engine: Change oil and filter. Change plugs, plug wires, distributor cap. Change fuel filter(s). Clean the air cleaner (spray it down with Brake Cleaner). Check all the hoses - if they don't feel new, replace them all (and the thermostat at the same time).
2. Transmission. Change fluid. Check the shaft coupler alignment as shown in the manual (Note: see section below about "Align engine to strut").
3. Check the battery terminals, and take the battery down to get it checked. It sucks to get to the lake and have a dead battery.
4. Grease the rudder, steering cable, and whatever else needs it.
5. Clean the boat, bow to stern. Pull everything out of all the storage, vacuum and clean. When you put stuff back, make sure you have everything you need:
- Whatever safety gear required by law in your jurisdiction (signalling devices, etc).
- Make sure you've got the necessary plugs (mine has a stern plug and a midships plug). Bring an extra of each.
- Ski gear - two flags (it sucks dropping one overboard), two ropes with handles, etc.
- Whatever tools you feel you might need and be able to use - at least a 6-in-1 screwdriver and pair of vise grips. My tool box on board weighs about 20 pounds, but I'm used to wrenching on things.
- Stash a spare pair of sunglasses and sunscreen in the glovebox - someone will forget theirs. Steal a plastic sandwich-sized Tupperware dish and lid for the glovebox - and make sure everyone on board puts their valuables in it (my wife put her engagement ring in the breast pocket of the shirt she was wearing - leaned over the rail to pick a ski out of the water, and it's now in 200 feet of water).
6. Trailer - pull the bearings, inspect and repack them. Check the age of the tires - if they're more than 5 years old, replace them. Inspect the brake fluid - if it's not clear, flush the whole system. If it's rusty, plan on replacing everything. Adjust the brakes if you have drums, inspect if you have disks. Make sure that when you hook up the trailer to your truck all the lights work. Make sure that, on level ground, the trailer is more-or-less level - if it isn't, change the ball height on your truck.
7. From outside the boat, inspect the strut and shaft log:
- kneel about 10 feet behind the boat, and look at the prop strut. It should be straight. If it isn't, you'll probably eventually want to replace it.
- Climb under the boat, and inspect where the prop shaft enters the boat through the shaft log. The shaft must NOT touch the shaft log - if it does, it'll eventually wear through the log. It doesn't have to be centered in the log, it just needs to not touch.
8. Align engine to strut. This is a job that needs to be done once in the lifetime of the boat and should be done at the factory, but often isn't done well. To determine if you need to do this, grab the prop and try to turn it with one hand. If you can do it with two fingers, you're in great shape. If it takes four fingers but only light effort, you're fine. If it takes two hands and a grunt, you really should do this.
In the world of inboard ski boats, the strut is the center of the world - everything gets aligned to it. It's non-adjustable, so when the propshaft goes through it and into the boat the transmission/engine need to move to meet it correctly. If the alignment isn't correct, the shaft will be flexing with each turn of the prop. Note that this alignment is different than the shaft coupling alignment specified in the owners manual - if you're going to do this one, you'll do the shaft coupling alignment as the second part of it. The attached document that's been floating around forever does a good job of walking you through it.

Feel free to ask any questions you have, there are lots of friendly and knowledgeable people here.



Why thank you! Very helpful
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  #9  
Old 01-27-2019, 11:57 AM
Anewman9 Anewman9 is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2018
Boat: 1997 prostar 205
Location: Texas
Posts: 23
so im pretty sure I have the standard 5.7 motor in the boat but is there a way I can find for sure? It looks like the sticker on the bottom of the motor is faded and hard make out. Is the serial # stamped somewhere else? Can I search the engine model based off the Hull ID?
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  #10  
Old 01-27-2019, 12:33 PM
JimN's Avatar
JimN JimN is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 13,533
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anewman9 View Post
so im pretty sure I have the standard 5.7 motor in the boat but is there a way I can find for sure? It looks like the sticker on the bottom of the motor is faded and hard make out. Is the serial # stamped somewhere else? Can I search the engine model based off the Hull ID?
If the valve covers have ribs on the top and throttle body injection, it could be a 5.0L/5.7L or it has a single orifice with an intake manifold that's high and narrow in the center, it's a 5.7L LT-1 Corvette engine. The valve covers and heads would be substantially wider if it was a big block.

Otherwise, post a photo and we can let you know.

Yes, MC can tell you, based on the hull ID. Actually, do a search here for decoding the hull ID and you'll see how to decode it.
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